ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Eleven genetic variations believed to be predictors of esophageal cancer have been identified by U.S. researchers.

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center team pinpointed 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA-related genes that showed an association with esophageal cancer.

Each of these unfavorable genotypes was linked with an increased risk of cancer. People with more than four of the 11 genotypes had a more than threefold increased risk of esophageal cancer, according to the study, published in the November issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

"Our ultimate goal is to construct a quantitative cancer risk prediction model based on an individual's epidemiological profile, environment exposure and genetic makeup. This risk prediction model can evaluate each person's relative risk and absolute risk of developing esophageal cancer within a certain time period," study author Dr. Xifeng Wu, a professor in the department of epidemiology, said in an American Association for Cancer Research news release.

Esophageal cancer is the fastest growing cancer in the United States, and the majority of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Being able to identify people at high risk for the disease may improve screening, monitoring and prevention.

"Considering the dramatic increase in incidence, difficulty of early diagnosis, the poor survival rate for esophageal cancer, and the limited knowledge of the natural history of the tumor, we need a greater understanding of the etiology of esophageal cancer for improvement of diagnosis and hopefully a better prognosis," Wu said.

Along with genetics, other risk factors for esophageal cancer include obesity, smoking and gastrointestinal reflux disease.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about esophageal cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Nov. 5, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 05, 2008

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