ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Eleven genetic variations believed to be predictors of esophageal cancer have been identified by U.S. researchers.

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center team pinpointed 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA-related genes that showed an association with esophageal cancer.

Each of these unfavorable genotypes was linked with an increased risk of cancer. People with more than four of the 11 genotypes had a more than threefold increased risk of esophageal cancer, according to the study, published in the November issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

"Our ultimate goal is to construct a quantitative cancer risk prediction model based on an individual's epidemiological profile, environment exposure and genetic makeup. This risk prediction model can evaluate each person's relative risk and absolute risk of developing esophageal cancer within a certain time period," study author Dr. Xifeng Wu, a professor in the department of epidemiology, said in an American Association for Cancer Research news release.

Esophageal cancer is the fastest growing cancer in the United States, and the majority of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Being able to identify people at high risk for the disease may improve screening, monitoring and prevention.

"Considering the dramatic increase in incidence, difficulty of early diagnosis, the poor survival rate for esophageal cancer, and the limited knowledge of the natural history of the tumor, we need a greater understanding of the etiology of esophageal cancer for improvement of diagnosis and hopefully a better prognosis," Wu said.

Along with genetics, other risk factors for esophageal cancer include obesity, smoking and gastrointestinal reflux disease.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about esophageal cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Nov. 5, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 05, 2008

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