ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Vegetables, nuts and the so-called "Mediterranean" diet are heart-friendly, while trans fats and foods with a high glycemic index can harm your heart, say researchers who reviewed 189 studies published between 1950 and 2007.

The studies included 146 prospective cohort studies (which examined past habits of participants) and 43 randomized controlled trials (volunteers were randomly assigned to consume a certain kind of diet).

"The relationship between dietary factors and coronary heart disease has been a major focus of health research for almost half a century," wrote Andrew Mente, of the Population Health Research Institute, and colleagues. But even though there are many published studies on the topic, "the strength of the evidence supporting valid associations has not been evaluated systemically in a single investigation."

When they pooled the findings from the studies and applied a predefined algorithm, Mente and his team identified "strong evidence of a causal relationship for protective factors, including intake of vegetables, nuts and monosaturated fatty acids and Mediterranean, prudent and high-quality dietary patterns, and harmful factors, including intake of trans-fatty acids and foods with a high glycemic index or load and a Western dietary pattern," the researchers wrote.

"Among these dietary exposures, however, only a Mediterranean dietary pattern has been studied in randomized controlled trials and significantly associated with coronary heart disease," they said.

The Mediterranean died is typically loaded with fruits, vegetables, grains and olive oil.

The researchers also found modest evidence of a causal relationship between heart health and several other foods and vitamins, such as fish, omega-3 fatty acids from marine sources, folate, whole grains, alcohol, fruits, fiber, dietary vitamins E and C and beta carotene. There was weak evidence of a causal relationship between heart health and vitamin E and C in supplement form, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and total fats, alpha-linoleic acid, meat, eggs and milk.

"The modest or weak evidence of these dietary exposures is mostly consistent with the findings of randomized controlled trials, although randomized controlled trials have yet to be conducted for several factors," the study authors wrote.

"Taken together, these findings support a causal relationship between only a few dietary exposures and coronary heart disease, whereas the evidence of most individual nutrients or foods is too modest to be conclusive," the team said.

The review was published in the April 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Although investigations of dietary components may help to shed light on mechanisms behind the benefits of dietary patterns, it is unlikely that modifying the intake of a few nutrients or foods would substantially influence coronary outcomes," Mente and colleagues concluded. "Our findings support the strategy of investigating dietary patterns in cohort studies and randomized controlled trials for common and complex chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease."

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about eating for a healthy heart.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, April 13, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com