ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Get to Know the Pap Test
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
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Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might affect women more often and more severely than men, new research suggests.

In a study of more than 6,000 people from around the world who had RA, about 79 percent of them women, Finnish researchers found that women had poorer outcomes in key measures such as symptoms and severity, especially in areas based on their responses to questionnaires.

The findings appear in the online journal Arthritis Research and Therapy.

"Obvious differences between genders exist in the prevalence, age at onset and level of production of harmful arthritis autoantibodies," study leader Tuulikki Sokka, a rheumatology consultant at Jyväskylä Central Hospital in Finland, said in a news release issued by the journal. "Furthermore, women report more symptoms and poor scores on most questionnaires, including scores for pain, depression, and other health-related items."

Some gender differences, though, stem from how disease activity is measured rather than from the disease itself, Sokka said.

"Women have less strength than men, which has as much of a major effect in the functional status of patients with RA as it does in the healthy population," Sokka said. "In fact, the gender differences in musculoskeletal performance remain, even among the fittest individuals." That's why, she said, male and female athletes generally don't compete against one another.

"Given that [a] woman is the 'weaker vessel' concerning musculoskeletal size and strength, and her baseline values are lower than men's, the same burden of a musculoskeletal disease may appear to be more harmful to a woman than to a man," Sokka explained.

More information

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about rheumatoid arthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: BioMed Central, news release, Jan. 13, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2009

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