ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Winter Is Tough on Feet
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might affect women more often and more severely than men, new research suggests.

In a study of more than 6,000 people from around the world who had RA, about 79 percent of them women, Finnish researchers found that women had poorer outcomes in key measures such as symptoms and severity, especially in areas based on their responses to questionnaires.

The findings appear in the online journal Arthritis Research and Therapy.

"Obvious differences between genders exist in the prevalence, age at onset and level of production of harmful arthritis autoantibodies," study leader Tuulikki Sokka, a rheumatology consultant at Jyväskylä Central Hospital in Finland, said in a news release issued by the journal. "Furthermore, women report more symptoms and poor scores on most questionnaires, including scores for pain, depression, and other health-related items."

Some gender differences, though, stem from how disease activity is measured rather than from the disease itself, Sokka said.

"Women have less strength than men, which has as much of a major effect in the functional status of patients with RA as it does in the healthy population," Sokka said. "In fact, the gender differences in musculoskeletal performance remain, even among the fittest individuals." That's why, she said, male and female athletes generally don't compete against one another.

"Given that [a] woman is the 'weaker vessel' concerning musculoskeletal size and strength, and her baseline values are lower than men's, the same burden of a musculoskeletal disease may appear to be more harmful to a woman than to a man," Sokka explained.

More information

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about rheumatoid arthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: BioMed Central, news release, Jan. 13, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2009

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