ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports

Sports offer children and teens many health and social benefits, but parents and players also need to be aware of the risks, experts advise.

Each year in the United States, 715,000 high school sports-related injuries are reported, and every day 8,000 children are treated in emergency departments for sports-related injuries, according to the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA).

"Sports injuries are a problem at any age, but kids playing increasingly competitive sports in school are especially at risk," Brian Robinson, chair of NATA's secondary school committee, said in a news release. "Educating parents and school personnel about ways to help children avoid common sports-related injuries is a top priority."

March is National Athletic Training Month, and this year's theme is "Sports Safety Is a Team Effort." NATA offers parents the following advice on how to reduce children's risk of sports-related injuries:

* Children should be physically and mentally "in shape" for the sport/activity level. Parents can consult with coaches to help make this judgment.
* All children should undergo a general medical exam and orthopedic screening to assess their readiness to play and detect any condition that may limit their participation.
* Find out who will provide first aid if your child suffers an injury. Many schools and sports teams have athletic trainers or parents with medical and first aid training and certification.
* Give coaches your child's medical history and a completed emergency medical authorization form that includes parent contact information and permission for emergency medical care for your child. Check with the school or sports league to obtain the form.
* Make sure children eat a healthy, balanced diet and keep properly hydrated.
* Check coaches' qualifications. They should have a background and knowledge in the sport they are coaching and should be credentialed if that's a requirement in the state, conference or league. They should also be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillator (AED) use and first aid. It is also important that they strictly enforce the rules of the sport and have a plan for dealing with emergencies.
* Ask if the school/league has an emergency action plan that's been reviewed by the athletic trainer or local emergency medical service.

SOURCES: National Athletic Trainers' Association, news release, March 2010 Published on: March 21, 2010