ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
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Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports

Sports offer children and teens many health and social benefits, but parents and players also need to be aware of the risks, experts advise.

Each year in the United States, 715,000 high school sports-related injuries are reported, and every day 8,000 children are treated in emergency departments for sports-related injuries, according to the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA).

"Sports injuries are a problem at any age, but kids playing increasingly competitive sports in school are especially at risk," Brian Robinson, chair of NATA's secondary school committee, said in a news release. "Educating parents and school personnel about ways to help children avoid common sports-related injuries is a top priority."

March is National Athletic Training Month, and this year's theme is "Sports Safety Is a Team Effort." NATA offers parents the following advice on how to reduce children's risk of sports-related injuries:

* Children should be physically and mentally "in shape" for the sport/activity level. Parents can consult with coaches to help make this judgment.
* All children should undergo a general medical exam and orthopedic screening to assess their readiness to play and detect any condition that may limit their participation.
* Find out who will provide first aid if your child suffers an injury. Many schools and sports teams have athletic trainers or parents with medical and first aid training and certification.
* Give coaches your child's medical history and a completed emergency medical authorization form that includes parent contact information and permission for emergency medical care for your child. Check with the school or sports league to obtain the form.
* Make sure children eat a healthy, balanced diet and keep properly hydrated.
* Check coaches' qualifications. They should have a background and knowledge in the sport they are coaching and should be credentialed if that's a requirement in the state, conference or league. They should also be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillator (AED) use and first aid. It is also important that they strictly enforce the rules of the sport and have a plan for dealing with emergencies.
* Ask if the school/league has an emergency action plan that's been reviewed by the athletic trainer or local emergency medical service.

SOURCES: National Athletic Trainers' Association, news release, March 2010 Published on: March 21, 2010