ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
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Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports

Sports offer children and teens many health and social benefits, but parents and players also need to be aware of the risks, experts advise.

Each year in the United States, 715,000 high school sports-related injuries are reported, and every day 8,000 children are treated in emergency departments for sports-related injuries, according to the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA).

"Sports injuries are a problem at any age, but kids playing increasingly competitive sports in school are especially at risk," Brian Robinson, chair of NATA's secondary school committee, said in a news release. "Educating parents and school personnel about ways to help children avoid common sports-related injuries is a top priority."

March is National Athletic Training Month, and this year's theme is "Sports Safety Is a Team Effort." NATA offers parents the following advice on how to reduce children's risk of sports-related injuries:

* Children should be physically and mentally "in shape" for the sport/activity level. Parents can consult with coaches to help make this judgment.
* All children should undergo a general medical exam and orthopedic screening to assess their readiness to play and detect any condition that may limit their participation.
* Find out who will provide first aid if your child suffers an injury. Many schools and sports teams have athletic trainers or parents with medical and first aid training and certification.
* Give coaches your child's medical history and a completed emergency medical authorization form that includes parent contact information and permission for emergency medical care for your child. Check with the school or sports league to obtain the form.
* Make sure children eat a healthy, balanced diet and keep properly hydrated.
* Check coaches' qualifications. They should have a background and knowledge in the sport they are coaching and should be credentialed if that's a requirement in the state, conference or league. They should also be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillator (AED) use and first aid. It is also important that they strictly enforce the rules of the sport and have a plan for dealing with emergencies.
* Ask if the school/league has an emergency action plan that's been reviewed by the athletic trainer or local emergency medical service.

SOURCES: National Athletic Trainers' Association, news release, March 2010 Published on: March 21, 2010