ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
The Unmedicated Mind
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Add your Article

Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they are on the verge of developing a saliva test for monitoring type 2 diabetes, which might someday replace invasive blood tests.

For the first time, researchers from Oregon and India have identified proteins in saliva that appear more frequently in people with diabetes than in non-diabetics. Using these proteins, they are working to develop a test to monitor and perhaps diagnose the condition.

However, Dr. Umesh Masharani, an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, doesn't think this approach is going to replace current blood tests any time soon.

"I think this is an interesting and novel approach," Masharani said. "I do not think this approach will be used in the diagnosis or treatment of diabetes any time in the near future. It is interesting, I think, for research studies in diabetes."

The report was published in the Jan. 2 issue of the Journal of Proteome Research.

For the study, Paturi V. Rao, from the departments of Endocrinology and Metabolism and Medicine at Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences University in Hyderabad, India, and colleagues analyzed saliva samples from people with and without type 2 diabetes. Their goal was to find proteins associated with the blood sugar disease.

The researchers found 65 proteins that occurred twice as frequently in the people with diabetes than in those without the condition.

Using these proteins, Rao's team hopes to develop a noninvasive test for diabetes screening, detection and monitoring.

Rao's group thinks the pain involved with current diabetes monitoring causes many diabetics to be lax in monitoring their condition. A noninvasive test could make it easier and less painful for patients to keep track of their blood sugar levels.

"As recent studies have shown that early and multi-factorial intervention in diabetes prevents cardiovascular complications and mortality, advances in understanding molecular aspects of preclinical diabetes will further facilitate accurate diagnosis and early intervention," the authors wrote.

Diabetes expert Dr. Charles F. Burant, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan, isn't convinced that a test using proteins in saliva is needed.

"I think it has minimal clinical impact," Burant said. "To be a valid biomarker, a test has to be sensitive and specific. We don't know the value of either for any of the proteins at the present time."

The biggest question is why this is needed, Burant noted. "Diabetes and prediabetes have a valid biomarker -- glucose -- that is the measure of the disease state. Thus, this is interesting biochemistry and raises questions why these changes occur, but the clinical utility is unclear."

More information

For more about type 2 diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association.



SOURCES: Umesh Masharani, M.D., associate clinical professor, medicine, University of California, San Francisco; Charles F. Burant, M.D., Ph.D., professor, internal medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Jan. 2, 2009, Journal of Proteome Research

Last Updated: Jan. 20, 2009

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