ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Salt intake has more of an effect on blood pressure in people with metabolic syndrome than in others, experts say, suggesting that cutting down on salt could be especially important for these high-risk individuals.

About one in five people are affected by metabolic syndrome, a combination of three or more conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those conditions include abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, high triglyceride concentration, low HDL cholesterol, and high glucose levels.

Researchers studied more than 1,900 Chinese people, 16 years and older, without diabetes. They were given a low-sodium diet for seven days followed by a high-sodium diet for seven days. Their blood pressure was checked a number of times during each diet phase.

The blood pressure of the 283 participants with metabolic syndrome was more sensitive to salt intake, the researchers reported. High salt sensitivity was defined as an increase in mean arterial blood pressure of more than 5 mm Hg during high salt intake and a decrease of more than 5 mm Hg during low salt intake.

Compared to those with no metabolic syndrome risk factors, those with four or five risk factors were 3.5 times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the low sodium phase and three times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the high sodium phase.

"These results suggest that metabolic syndrome enhances blood pressure response to sodium intake. Reduction in sodium intake could be an especially important component in reducing blood pressure in patients with multiple risk factors for metabolic syndrome," Dr Jing Chen, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La. and colleagues concluded.

The study was published online Monday and is expected to be in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Feb. 16, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2009

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