ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Get to Know the Pap Test
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Drink Away Dementia?
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
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Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Salt intake has more of an effect on blood pressure in people with metabolic syndrome than in others, experts say, suggesting that cutting down on salt could be especially important for these high-risk individuals.

About one in five people are affected by metabolic syndrome, a combination of three or more conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those conditions include abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, high triglyceride concentration, low HDL cholesterol, and high glucose levels.

Researchers studied more than 1,900 Chinese people, 16 years and older, without diabetes. They were given a low-sodium diet for seven days followed by a high-sodium diet for seven days. Their blood pressure was checked a number of times during each diet phase.

The blood pressure of the 283 participants with metabolic syndrome was more sensitive to salt intake, the researchers reported. High salt sensitivity was defined as an increase in mean arterial blood pressure of more than 5 mm Hg during high salt intake and a decrease of more than 5 mm Hg during low salt intake.

Compared to those with no metabolic syndrome risk factors, those with four or five risk factors were 3.5 times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the low sodium phase and three times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the high sodium phase.

"These results suggest that metabolic syndrome enhances blood pressure response to sodium intake. Reduction in sodium intake could be an especially important component in reducing blood pressure in patients with multiple risk factors for metabolic syndrome," Dr Jing Chen, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La. and colleagues concluded.

The study was published online Monday and is expected to be in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Feb. 16, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2009

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