ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Add your Article

Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Salt intake has more of an effect on blood pressure in people with metabolic syndrome than in others, experts say, suggesting that cutting down on salt could be especially important for these high-risk individuals.

About one in five people are affected by metabolic syndrome, a combination of three or more conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those conditions include abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, high triglyceride concentration, low HDL cholesterol, and high glucose levels.

Researchers studied more than 1,900 Chinese people, 16 years and older, without diabetes. They were given a low-sodium diet for seven days followed by a high-sodium diet for seven days. Their blood pressure was checked a number of times during each diet phase.

The blood pressure of the 283 participants with metabolic syndrome was more sensitive to salt intake, the researchers reported. High salt sensitivity was defined as an increase in mean arterial blood pressure of more than 5 mm Hg during high salt intake and a decrease of more than 5 mm Hg during low salt intake.

Compared to those with no metabolic syndrome risk factors, those with four or five risk factors were 3.5 times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the low sodium phase and three times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the high sodium phase.

"These results suggest that metabolic syndrome enhances blood pressure response to sodium intake. Reduction in sodium intake could be an especially important component in reducing blood pressure in patients with multiple risk factors for metabolic syndrome," Dr Jing Chen, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La. and colleagues concluded.

The study was published online Monday and is expected to be in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Feb. 16, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2009

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