ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Salt intake has more of an effect on blood pressure in people with metabolic syndrome than in others, experts say, suggesting that cutting down on salt could be especially important for these high-risk individuals.

About one in five people are affected by metabolic syndrome, a combination of three or more conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those conditions include abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, high triglyceride concentration, low HDL cholesterol, and high glucose levels.

Researchers studied more than 1,900 Chinese people, 16 years and older, without diabetes. They were given a low-sodium diet for seven days followed by a high-sodium diet for seven days. Their blood pressure was checked a number of times during each diet phase.

The blood pressure of the 283 participants with metabolic syndrome was more sensitive to salt intake, the researchers reported. High salt sensitivity was defined as an increase in mean arterial blood pressure of more than 5 mm Hg during high salt intake and a decrease of more than 5 mm Hg during low salt intake.

Compared to those with no metabolic syndrome risk factors, those with four or five risk factors were 3.5 times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the low sodium phase and three times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the high sodium phase.

"These results suggest that metabolic syndrome enhances blood pressure response to sodium intake. Reduction in sodium intake could be an especially important component in reducing blood pressure in patients with multiple risk factors for metabolic syndrome," Dr Jing Chen, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La. and colleagues concluded.

The study was published online Monday and is expected to be in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Feb. 16, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2009

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