ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Salt intake has more of an effect on blood pressure in people with metabolic syndrome than in others, experts say, suggesting that cutting down on salt could be especially important for these high-risk individuals.

About one in five people are affected by metabolic syndrome, a combination of three or more conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those conditions include abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, high triglyceride concentration, low HDL cholesterol, and high glucose levels.

Researchers studied more than 1,900 Chinese people, 16 years and older, without diabetes. They were given a low-sodium diet for seven days followed by a high-sodium diet for seven days. Their blood pressure was checked a number of times during each diet phase.

The blood pressure of the 283 participants with metabolic syndrome was more sensitive to salt intake, the researchers reported. High salt sensitivity was defined as an increase in mean arterial blood pressure of more than 5 mm Hg during high salt intake and a decrease of more than 5 mm Hg during low salt intake.

Compared to those with no metabolic syndrome risk factors, those with four or five risk factors were 3.5 times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the low sodium phase and three times more likely to have high salt-sensitivity during the high sodium phase.

"These results suggest that metabolic syndrome enhances blood pressure response to sodium intake. Reduction in sodium intake could be an especially important component in reducing blood pressure in patients with multiple risk factors for metabolic syndrome," Dr Jing Chen, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La. and colleagues concluded.

The study was published online Monday and is expected to be in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Feb. 16, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2009

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