ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
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Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
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Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Just as many schools are ramping up physical education programs to battle the childhood obesity epidemic, the number of kids being injured during gym class has risen dramatically, Ohio State University researchers report.

In fact, between 1997 and 2007, the annual number of injuries related to physical education (PE) increased 150 percent -- from 24,000 in 1997 to about 62,000 in 2007, the scientists said.

"We don't have an answer as to why injuries are increasing," said lead researcher Lara McKenzie, principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus.

"I don't think it's because more people are participating in PE," she said. "From all accounts, participation is down over the last couple of decades, and [there's been] only a slight increase in the past couple of years."

The report is published online Aug. 3 in Pediatrics.

For the study, McKenzie's team used data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to gather information on PE-related injuries. During the 11 years of the study, 405,305 children and adolescents were treated in emergency departments for injuries stemming from their PE classes, the researchers found.

"Most of the patients, about 98 percent of the cases, were seen and released," McKenzie said. "Of those who were hospitalized, about 75 percent were boys."

Almost 70 percent of the injuries happened during running, basketball, football, volleyball, soccer or gymnastics, she said.

Injuries differed for boys and girls, she noted. Boys were more likely to be injured on the head, during collisions with other people and during group activities. Girls were more apt to suffer strains and sprains to the legs and to be injured during individual activities.

Most injuries (52 percent) occurred among kids in middle school, McKenzie said.

Given the increasing recognition of the importance of physical activity, the authors suggested that more research is needed to develop injury-prevention strategies.

And McKenzie stressed that living an active lifestyle is important, especially for children. "Parents and school administrators have to be vigilant about these types of injuries because there are so many," she said.

Pete McCall, an exercise physiologist with the American Council on Exercise, said he thinks that gym class injuries are increasing because young children are being taught how to play sports rather than being given basic training in movement and body awareness in elementary school.

Before children start playing sports, he said, they need to develop movement skills.

"If kids aren't out moving and playing before they are 9 or 10, they are not going to develop a lot of the motor skills they need when they are older," McCall explained.

He said that movement training should start early. "As a kid is 2 or 3, get him into gymnastics or martial arts or dance," McCall said. "Between 4 and 8, don't worry about sports."

"Sports should be secondary to movement," he said. "Movement skills should be first -- controlling balance, controlling center of gravity. And then, once kids understand that and have the body awareness, then they can progress into more advanced and more challenging sports."

McCall also suggests that children participate in several sports, not just one.

"Kids who grow up playing multi-sports are a lot more resistant to injury because they are used to different patterns of movement," he noted.

SOURCES: Lara McKenzie, Ph.D., principal investigator, Center for Injury Research and Policy, Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Pete McCall, M.S., exercise physiologist, American Council on Exercise, San Diego; Aug. 3, 2009, Pediatrics, online