ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
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Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
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School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Just as many schools are ramping up physical education programs to battle the childhood obesity epidemic, the number of kids being injured during gym class has risen dramatically, Ohio State University researchers report.

In fact, between 1997 and 2007, the annual number of injuries related to physical education (PE) increased 150 percent -- from 24,000 in 1997 to about 62,000 in 2007, the scientists said.

"We don't have an answer as to why injuries are increasing," said lead researcher Lara McKenzie, principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus.

"I don't think it's because more people are participating in PE," she said. "From all accounts, participation is down over the last couple of decades, and [there's been] only a slight increase in the past couple of years."

The report is published online Aug. 3 in Pediatrics.

For the study, McKenzie's team used data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to gather information on PE-related injuries. During the 11 years of the study, 405,305 children and adolescents were treated in emergency departments for injuries stemming from their PE classes, the researchers found.

"Most of the patients, about 98 percent of the cases, were seen and released," McKenzie said. "Of those who were hospitalized, about 75 percent were boys."

Almost 70 percent of the injuries happened during running, basketball, football, volleyball, soccer or gymnastics, she said.

Injuries differed for boys and girls, she noted. Boys were more likely to be injured on the head, during collisions with other people and during group activities. Girls were more apt to suffer strains and sprains to the legs and to be injured during individual activities.

Most injuries (52 percent) occurred among kids in middle school, McKenzie said.

Given the increasing recognition of the importance of physical activity, the authors suggested that more research is needed to develop injury-prevention strategies.

And McKenzie stressed that living an active lifestyle is important, especially for children. "Parents and school administrators have to be vigilant about these types of injuries because there are so many," she said.

Pete McCall, an exercise physiologist with the American Council on Exercise, said he thinks that gym class injuries are increasing because young children are being taught how to play sports rather than being given basic training in movement and body awareness in elementary school.

Before children start playing sports, he said, they need to develop movement skills.

"If kids aren't out moving and playing before they are 9 or 10, they are not going to develop a lot of the motor skills they need when they are older," McCall explained.

He said that movement training should start early. "As a kid is 2 or 3, get him into gymnastics or martial arts or dance," McCall said. "Between 4 and 8, don't worry about sports."

"Sports should be secondary to movement," he said. "Movement skills should be first -- controlling balance, controlling center of gravity. And then, once kids understand that and have the body awareness, then they can progress into more advanced and more challenging sports."

McCall also suggests that children participate in several sports, not just one.

"Kids who grow up playing multi-sports are a lot more resistant to injury because they are used to different patterns of movement," he noted.

SOURCES: Lara McKenzie, Ph.D., principal investigator, Center for Injury Research and Policy, Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Pete McCall, M.S., exercise physiologist, American Council on Exercise, San Diego; Aug. 3, 2009, Pediatrics, online