ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
The Unmedicated Mind
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue

(HealthDay News) -- The natural glue a sea creature uses to build its home has offered scientists a new way to repair bones shattered in car crashes and other accidents.

The inch-long sandcastle worm builds a shelter in the surf by secreting a glue that it uses to hold together bits of sand and sea shells. Researchers reported at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society that they have duplicated the glue, creating a much-desired medical adhesive.

The traditional method of repairing shattered bones is to use connectors such as nails, pins and metal screws for support until the bones can bear weight. But it can be incredibly difficult to align small bone fragments with screws and wires, said Russell Stewart, a bioengineer at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

A medical adhesive would provide a much better alternative. Stewart's challenge was to devise a water-based adhesive that is insoluble in wet environments and able to bond to wet objects.

"We recognized that the mechanism used by the sandcastle worm is really a perfect vehicle for producing an underwater adhesive," Stewart said. "This glue, just like the worm's glue, is a fluid material that, although it doesn't mix with water, is water soluble."

The new synthetic glue has passed toxicity studies in cell culture, said Stewart. It is at least as strong as Super Glue and twice as strong as the natural adhesive it mimics, he said.

Stewart has begun pilot studies in which the adhesive would also deliver medicines such as antibiotics to the fracture site.

"We are very optimistic about this synthetic glue," he said. "Biocompatibility is one of the major challenges of creating an adhesive like this. Anytime you put something synthetic into the body, there's a chance the body will respond to it and damage the surrounding tissue. That's something we will monitor, but we've seen no indication right now that it will be a problem."

SOURCES: American Chemical Society, news release, August 17, 2009