ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Be Healthy, Spend Less
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
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Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue

(HealthDay News) -- The natural glue a sea creature uses to build its home has offered scientists a new way to repair bones shattered in car crashes and other accidents.

The inch-long sandcastle worm builds a shelter in the surf by secreting a glue that it uses to hold together bits of sand and sea shells. Researchers reported at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society that they have duplicated the glue, creating a much-desired medical adhesive.

The traditional method of repairing shattered bones is to use connectors such as nails, pins and metal screws for support until the bones can bear weight. But it can be incredibly difficult to align small bone fragments with screws and wires, said Russell Stewart, a bioengineer at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

A medical adhesive would provide a much better alternative. Stewart's challenge was to devise a water-based adhesive that is insoluble in wet environments and able to bond to wet objects.

"We recognized that the mechanism used by the sandcastle worm is really a perfect vehicle for producing an underwater adhesive," Stewart said. "This glue, just like the worm's glue, is a fluid material that, although it doesn't mix with water, is water soluble."

The new synthetic glue has passed toxicity studies in cell culture, said Stewart. It is at least as strong as Super Glue and twice as strong as the natural adhesive it mimics, he said.

Stewart has begun pilot studies in which the adhesive would also deliver medicines such as antibiotics to the fracture site.

"We are very optimistic about this synthetic glue," he said. "Biocompatibility is one of the major challenges of creating an adhesive like this. Anytime you put something synthetic into the body, there's a chance the body will respond to it and damage the surrounding tissue. That's something we will monitor, but we've seen no indication right now that it will be a problem."

SOURCES: American Chemical Society, news release, August 17, 2009