ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
A Honey of a Sinusitis Treatment
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels

FRIDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular function can be affected by as little as 10 minutes exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke and other air pollutants such as wood smoke and smoke from cooking oil, say U.S. researchers.

There's increasing evidence that higher levels of air pollution are associated with an increase in heart attacks and deaths, according to background information in an American Physiological Society news release. Smoke pollutants contain fine particles that trigger responses in heart and blood vessels.

This University of Kentucky study included 40 healthy male and female nonsmokers, average age 35, who were exposed to the three types of smoke while they sat in a 10-by-10-foot chamber. While the volunteers were exposed to the smoke, their respiratory and cardiovascular function was measured by the researchers.

The results showed that exposure to smoke changed affected cardiovascular function, particularly in men. The findings were expected to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS), April 18-22, in New Orleans.

The study confirmed previous research that has shown that smoke harms cardiovascular function and extended those findings by showing that this harm can occur with lower levels of smoke and shorter exposure times.

"I was surprised we got statistically significant results with this low level of exposure. If we can detect these effects with smaller exposures, then the public health hazard from cigarettes and other particulate exposures may have been underestimated," study author Joyce McClendon Evans said in an APS news release.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Physiological Society, news release, April 17, 2009

Last Updated: April 17, 2009

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