ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Add your Article

Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels

FRIDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular function can be affected by as little as 10 minutes exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke and other air pollutants such as wood smoke and smoke from cooking oil, say U.S. researchers.

There's increasing evidence that higher levels of air pollution are associated with an increase in heart attacks and deaths, according to background information in an American Physiological Society news release. Smoke pollutants contain fine particles that trigger responses in heart and blood vessels.

This University of Kentucky study included 40 healthy male and female nonsmokers, average age 35, who were exposed to the three types of smoke while they sat in a 10-by-10-foot chamber. While the volunteers were exposed to the smoke, their respiratory and cardiovascular function was measured by the researchers.

The results showed that exposure to smoke changed affected cardiovascular function, particularly in men. The findings were expected to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS), April 18-22, in New Orleans.

The study confirmed previous research that has shown that smoke harms cardiovascular function and extended those findings by showing that this harm can occur with lower levels of smoke and shorter exposure times.

"I was surprised we got statistically significant results with this low level of exposure. If we can detect these effects with smaller exposures, then the public health hazard from cigarettes and other particulate exposures may have been underestimated," study author Joyce McClendon Evans said in an APS news release.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Physiological Society, news release, April 17, 2009

Last Updated: April 17, 2009

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