ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels

FRIDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular function can be affected by as little as 10 minutes exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke and other air pollutants such as wood smoke and smoke from cooking oil, say U.S. researchers.

There's increasing evidence that higher levels of air pollution are associated with an increase in heart attacks and deaths, according to background information in an American Physiological Society news release. Smoke pollutants contain fine particles that trigger responses in heart and blood vessels.

This University of Kentucky study included 40 healthy male and female nonsmokers, average age 35, who were exposed to the three types of smoke while they sat in a 10-by-10-foot chamber. While the volunteers were exposed to the smoke, their respiratory and cardiovascular function was measured by the researchers.

The results showed that exposure to smoke changed affected cardiovascular function, particularly in men. The findings were expected to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS), April 18-22, in New Orleans.

The study confirmed previous research that has shown that smoke harms cardiovascular function and extended those findings by showing that this harm can occur with lower levels of smoke and shorter exposure times.

"I was surprised we got statistically significant results with this low level of exposure. If we can detect these effects with smaller exposures, then the public health hazard from cigarettes and other particulate exposures may have been underestimated," study author Joyce McClendon Evans said in an APS news release.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Physiological Society, news release, April 17, 2009

Last Updated: April 17, 2009

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