ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
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Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels

FRIDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular function can be affected by as little as 10 minutes exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke and other air pollutants such as wood smoke and smoke from cooking oil, say U.S. researchers.

There's increasing evidence that higher levels of air pollution are associated with an increase in heart attacks and deaths, according to background information in an American Physiological Society news release. Smoke pollutants contain fine particles that trigger responses in heart and blood vessels.

This University of Kentucky study included 40 healthy male and female nonsmokers, average age 35, who were exposed to the three types of smoke while they sat in a 10-by-10-foot chamber. While the volunteers were exposed to the smoke, their respiratory and cardiovascular function was measured by the researchers.

The results showed that exposure to smoke changed affected cardiovascular function, particularly in men. The findings were expected to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS), April 18-22, in New Orleans.

The study confirmed previous research that has shown that smoke harms cardiovascular function and extended those findings by showing that this harm can occur with lower levels of smoke and shorter exposure times.

"I was surprised we got statistically significant results with this low level of exposure. If we can detect these effects with smaller exposures, then the public health hazard from cigarettes and other particulate exposures may have been underestimated," study author Joyce McClendon Evans said in an APS news release.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Physiological Society, news release, April 17, 2009

Last Updated: April 17, 2009

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