ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy older adults cope better with sleep deprivation than younger adults, and daytime sleepiness among older adults isn't a normal part of aging, U.S. researchers say.

Their study included 11 older adults (aged 65 to 76) and 26 young adults (aged 18 to 29) who had three nights of eight hours of sleep followed by a 26-hour period of staying awake. During that period of wakefulness, the study participants remained sitting in bed and had someone in the room to help keep them awake. They weren't allowed to exercise or to drink caffeinated beverages.

After the period of wakefulness, the older adults were less impaired by sleep deprivation, showed faster reaction times and fewer performance lapses, paid better attention, and had fewer unintentional sleep episodes than the younger adults, the study authors found.

The study was published in the May 3 online issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

"Even very healthy adults like those in our study see a decline in sleep quality and duration as they age. And it is often assumed that daytime sleepiness in older adults is the result of the typical changes in nighttime sleep that come with age," Jeanne Duffy, of the sleep medicine division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a hospital news release.

But these findings show "that daytime sleepiness in older adults should not be attributed to a normal consequence of the aging process. Rather, daytime sleepiness may instead be a result of a number of other potential factors, such as chronic medical conditions, undiagnosed sleep disorders, or side effects of medications older people may be taking," Duffy explained.

Duffy said older adults who fall asleep unintentionally during the daytime or early evening should be checked by a doctor for the underlying cause of their sleepiness.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about a good night's sleep.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 07, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com