ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
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Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy older adults cope better with sleep deprivation than younger adults, and daytime sleepiness among older adults isn't a normal part of aging, U.S. researchers say.

Their study included 11 older adults (aged 65 to 76) and 26 young adults (aged 18 to 29) who had three nights of eight hours of sleep followed by a 26-hour period of staying awake. During that period of wakefulness, the study participants remained sitting in bed and had someone in the room to help keep them awake. They weren't allowed to exercise or to drink caffeinated beverages.

After the period of wakefulness, the older adults were less impaired by sleep deprivation, showed faster reaction times and fewer performance lapses, paid better attention, and had fewer unintentional sleep episodes than the younger adults, the study authors found.

The study was published in the May 3 online issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

"Even very healthy adults like those in our study see a decline in sleep quality and duration as they age. And it is often assumed that daytime sleepiness in older adults is the result of the typical changes in nighttime sleep that come with age," Jeanne Duffy, of the sleep medicine division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a hospital news release.

But these findings show "that daytime sleepiness in older adults should not be attributed to a normal consequence of the aging process. Rather, daytime sleepiness may instead be a result of a number of other potential factors, such as chronic medical conditions, undiagnosed sleep disorders, or side effects of medications older people may be taking," Duffy explained.

Duffy said older adults who fall asleep unintentionally during the daytime or early evening should be checked by a doctor for the underlying cause of their sleepiness.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about a good night's sleep.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 07, 2009

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