ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy older adults cope better with sleep deprivation than younger adults, and daytime sleepiness among older adults isn't a normal part of aging, U.S. researchers say.

Their study included 11 older adults (aged 65 to 76) and 26 young adults (aged 18 to 29) who had three nights of eight hours of sleep followed by a 26-hour period of staying awake. During that period of wakefulness, the study participants remained sitting in bed and had someone in the room to help keep them awake. They weren't allowed to exercise or to drink caffeinated beverages.

After the period of wakefulness, the older adults were less impaired by sleep deprivation, showed faster reaction times and fewer performance lapses, paid better attention, and had fewer unintentional sleep episodes than the younger adults, the study authors found.

The study was published in the May 3 online issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

"Even very healthy adults like those in our study see a decline in sleep quality and duration as they age. And it is often assumed that daytime sleepiness in older adults is the result of the typical changes in nighttime sleep that come with age," Jeanne Duffy, of the sleep medicine division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a hospital news release.

But these findings show "that daytime sleepiness in older adults should not be attributed to a normal consequence of the aging process. Rather, daytime sleepiness may instead be a result of a number of other potential factors, such as chronic medical conditions, undiagnosed sleep disorders, or side effects of medications older people may be taking," Duffy explained.

Duffy said older adults who fall asleep unintentionally during the daytime or early evening should be checked by a doctor for the underlying cause of their sleepiness.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about a good night's sleep.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 07, 2009

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