ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy older adults cope better with sleep deprivation than younger adults, and daytime sleepiness among older adults isn't a normal part of aging, U.S. researchers say.

Their study included 11 older adults (aged 65 to 76) and 26 young adults (aged 18 to 29) who had three nights of eight hours of sleep followed by a 26-hour period of staying awake. During that period of wakefulness, the study participants remained sitting in bed and had someone in the room to help keep them awake. They weren't allowed to exercise or to drink caffeinated beverages.

After the period of wakefulness, the older adults were less impaired by sleep deprivation, showed faster reaction times and fewer performance lapses, paid better attention, and had fewer unintentional sleep episodes than the younger adults, the study authors found.

The study was published in the May 3 online issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

"Even very healthy adults like those in our study see a decline in sleep quality and duration as they age. And it is often assumed that daytime sleepiness in older adults is the result of the typical changes in nighttime sleep that come with age," Jeanne Duffy, of the sleep medicine division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a hospital news release.

But these findings show "that daytime sleepiness in older adults should not be attributed to a normal consequence of the aging process. Rather, daytime sleepiness may instead be a result of a number of other potential factors, such as chronic medical conditions, undiagnosed sleep disorders, or side effects of medications older people may be taking," Duffy explained.

Duffy said older adults who fall asleep unintentionally during the daytime or early evening should be checked by a doctor for the underlying cause of their sleepiness.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about a good night's sleep.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 07, 2009

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