ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Barefoot Best for Running?
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style

(HealthDay News) -- The house is empty, the kids have gone back to school. Call it a sort of empty-nest syndrome, except that the remaining occupant of the home is busy chewing the remote control and the couch.

It's not an uncommon scenario as canines across the country are "abandoned" by their best human friends come fall and back-to-school season.

"You've got to think of it from the dog's point of view. One day everybody's there, and then the next, everybody's gone and it happens that fast," said Judi Halliburton, a companion animal behaviorist in Albuquerque, N.M., and author of the book Raising Rover: Breed-By-Breed Training from Afghans to Yorkies. "Then people start coming home from school, from work and finding the living room all torn up."

Your first thought will probably be that the dog is angry. But, according to Halliburton, your pet's not mad -- it's a case of separation anxiety.

"For all they know, these humans got sucked up into a black hole," she said. "They have no idea what happened to them."

"Back to school can cause separation anxiety in some dogs," agreed Adam Goldfarb, director of the Pets at Risk program for the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). "They're used to playing all day with their best friend, then they're alone for six to eight hours a day. It can be hard for some dogs."

"It can manifest as barking, whining, scratching at the door, chewing inappropriate items, or more medical symptoms such as lethargy or not eating well," he added. "And it can happen to any breed."

But there is hope.

"You can get them through it. You just need to set the stage," Halliburton said.

For instance, back-to-school or not, every time you leave the house you need to say good-bye to your dog, Halliburton said. It doesn't literally have to be "good-bye," it can be "May the force be with you!" or any other phrase. The point is to condition your dog to know that when he hears this phrase, he will also see you again later, she said.

"You have to provide a security base where their world is maintained," she said.

Here are some other tips:

* Leave clothes with your scent on them around the house. "That's security," Halliburton said.
* Make sure your dog can keep busy while you're gone. "If you can get a dog beyond the first 45 minutes after you've left, you've got it made," Halliburton said. Try giving your dog an empty milk container without the lid, but with some of the milk residue still inside it. "Dogs will be attracted by the smell, then they find out it makes a really neat noise and then they're king of the mountain," Halliburton said. "They can super-entertain themselves."
* If your dog is outside, hang an old bike tire, a bunch of dish rags knotted together or a shoe from a tree so the dog can play with them, Halliburton said.
* Have a pet sitter come over once in a while to spend time with the dog, or try doggie daycare two or three times a week. "That can be really enjoyable," Goldfarb said.
* Put the radio on a talk station and leave it on while you're gone. "That noise muffles any other kinds of sounds the dog might worry about and it's just background," Halliburton said. "It's comforting. Those are the sounds they hear when humans are home."

SOURCES: Judi Halliburton, companion animal behaviorist, Albuquerque, N.M.; Adam Goldfarb, director, Pets at Risk program, Humane Society of the United States