ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Parents with family secrets may struggle to decide what to share with their children. But when it comes to cancer running in the family, a new study shows that those who choose to reveal the results of genetic tests are glad they did.

Scientists know that two genes are to blame for the majority of inherited breast and ovarian cancer cases, and tests can show if a woman has those genes.

For the study, researchers from the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center interviewed 221 mothers and 124 partners (mostly fathers) before the genetic test results were revealed and again one and six months later.

More than 60 percent of the mothers and more than 40 percent of their partners talked with their children about the results within a month of getting them. Even more had the discussion within six months of getting the results, the findings show.

Mothers who revealed the test results reported being more satisfied with their decision than the ones who decided to keep them a secret, according to the researchers.

The findings are to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, being held later this month in Florida.

"Both parents make decisions about revealing predictive genetic test results to children within a relatively short period of time, even though there is no immediate health implication for children to learn that news," said lead investigator Kenneth Tercyak, an associate professor of oncology and pediatrics at Lombardi. "Children growing up in families surrounded by cancer can be worried about whether cancer may happen to them someday. Cancer genetic tests provide a piece of that information."

A positive side effect of the decision to share the results was a more open parent-child relationship, Tercyak said.

Sharing test results can be considered part of a family's attitude toward health and wellness, said study co-author Beth Peshkin, a genetic counselor at Lombardi.

"Although we do not yet know how to offset familial risks of cancer in future generations, it can be very empowering for parents to promote positive health habits in their children early on, like not smoking, eating a well-balanced diet, exercising regularly and avoiding excess exposure to the sun," Peshkin said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about genetic testing for cancer.



-- Dennis Thompson



SOURCE: Georgetown University Medical Center, news release, May 14, 2009

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

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