ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Parents with family secrets may struggle to decide what to share with their children. But when it comes to cancer running in the family, a new study shows that those who choose to reveal the results of genetic tests are glad they did.

Scientists know that two genes are to blame for the majority of inherited breast and ovarian cancer cases, and tests can show if a woman has those genes.

For the study, researchers from the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center interviewed 221 mothers and 124 partners (mostly fathers) before the genetic test results were revealed and again one and six months later.

More than 60 percent of the mothers and more than 40 percent of their partners talked with their children about the results within a month of getting them. Even more had the discussion within six months of getting the results, the findings show.

Mothers who revealed the test results reported being more satisfied with their decision than the ones who decided to keep them a secret, according to the researchers.

The findings are to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, being held later this month in Florida.

"Both parents make decisions about revealing predictive genetic test results to children within a relatively short period of time, even though there is no immediate health implication for children to learn that news," said lead investigator Kenneth Tercyak, an associate professor of oncology and pediatrics at Lombardi. "Children growing up in families surrounded by cancer can be worried about whether cancer may happen to them someday. Cancer genetic tests provide a piece of that information."

A positive side effect of the decision to share the results was a more open parent-child relationship, Tercyak said.

Sharing test results can be considered part of a family's attitude toward health and wellness, said study co-author Beth Peshkin, a genetic counselor at Lombardi.

"Although we do not yet know how to offset familial risks of cancer in future generations, it can be very empowering for parents to promote positive health habits in their children early on, like not smoking, eating a well-balanced diet, exercising regularly and avoiding excess exposure to the sun," Peshkin said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about genetic testing for cancer.



-- Dennis Thompson



SOURCE: Georgetown University Medical Center, news release, May 14, 2009

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

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