ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Parents with family secrets may struggle to decide what to share with their children. But when it comes to cancer running in the family, a new study shows that those who choose to reveal the results of genetic tests are glad they did.

Scientists know that two genes are to blame for the majority of inherited breast and ovarian cancer cases, and tests can show if a woman has those genes.

For the study, researchers from the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center interviewed 221 mothers and 124 partners (mostly fathers) before the genetic test results were revealed and again one and six months later.

More than 60 percent of the mothers and more than 40 percent of their partners talked with their children about the results within a month of getting them. Even more had the discussion within six months of getting the results, the findings show.

Mothers who revealed the test results reported being more satisfied with their decision than the ones who decided to keep them a secret, according to the researchers.

The findings are to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, being held later this month in Florida.

"Both parents make decisions about revealing predictive genetic test results to children within a relatively short period of time, even though there is no immediate health implication for children to learn that news," said lead investigator Kenneth Tercyak, an associate professor of oncology and pediatrics at Lombardi. "Children growing up in families surrounded by cancer can be worried about whether cancer may happen to them someday. Cancer genetic tests provide a piece of that information."

A positive side effect of the decision to share the results was a more open parent-child relationship, Tercyak said.

Sharing test results can be considered part of a family's attitude toward health and wellness, said study co-author Beth Peshkin, a genetic counselor at Lombardi.

"Although we do not yet know how to offset familial risks of cancer in future generations, it can be very empowering for parents to promote positive health habits in their children early on, like not smoking, eating a well-balanced diet, exercising regularly and avoiding excess exposure to the sun," Peshkin said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about genetic testing for cancer.



-- Dennis Thompson



SOURCE: Georgetown University Medical Center, news release, May 14, 2009

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

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