ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Add your Article

Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA

SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Breathing polluted air for even a short period of time can cause some genes to undergo reprogramming, which may affect a person's risk of developing cancer and other diseases, say Italian researchers.

Comparisons of blood DNA samples from healthy workers who were exposed to high levels of airborne particulates at a foundry near Milan revealed that after only three days of exposure, changes occurred in four genes that have been linked to tumor suppression, according to research presented Sunday at the International Conference of the American Thoracic Society, in San Diego.

This finding indicates "that environmental factors need little time to cause gene reprogramming, which is potentially associated with disease outcomes," investigator Dr. Andrea Baccarelli, assistant professor of applied biotechnology at the University of Milan, said in a news release issued by the conference's sponsor.

"As several of the effects of particulate matter in foundries are similar to those found after exposure to ambient air pollution, our results open new hypotheses about how air pollutants modify human health," Baccarelli said.

The changes in the foundry workers' genes may have been caused by DNA methylation, a chemical transformation process that has been linked to gene reprogramming and has been found in the blood and tissue samples of lung cancer patients, Baccarelli noted.

"The changes in DNA methylation we observed are reversible, and some of them are currently being used as targets of cancer drugs," said the researcher, who added that it might be possible to design early interventions that could program that gene back to normal and mitigate the increased health risks of air pollutants.

"We need to evaluate how the changes in gene reprogramming we observed are related to cancer risk," Baccarelli said.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about lung disease.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, May 17, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com