ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?

The U.S. Congress has just voted to categorize tobacco as a drug, handing the FDA regulatory authority to control the advertising, marketing and sales of cigarettes. This hilarious move, if approved by the Senate and signed by the President, would put the FDA in the position of approving the sale of a "drug" that the entire medical community openly admits kills millions of people. According to the CDC, tobacco kills 438,000 people each year in the United States alone (1). Now, thanks to the U.S. Congress, the FDA could soon be the government office responsible for allowing these 438,000 deaths each year!

Think about it: Right now, FDA-approved drugs kill around 100,000 Americans a year, and that's if you believe the conservative figures from the American Medical Association (the real numbers are at least double that). Add tobacco deaths to that list, and you come to the startling realization that if tobacco is considered an FDA-approved "drug," then FDA-approved drugs will kill well over half a million Americans each year! (538,000 fatalities a year due to FDA-approved drugs, using government statistics.)

That's a level of fatalities that terrorists haven't even come close to approaching.
Why the FDA doesn't want to regulate tobacco

Obviously, the FDA does not want to find itself in this position, because if regulatory authority over tobacco is shoved onto the FDA, it would be forced to declare tobacco an unapproved, unsafe drug and ban its sale.

Why? Because there have been no clinical studies whatsoever supporting the use of tobacco as a medicine. And if it's considered a drug, then the FDA must apply the same rules to tobacco that it applies to other substances. And there's absolutely no way a series of clinical trials could show tobacco to be safe or effective at treating disease. (Unless, of course, Big Tobacco funds the studies, in which case cigarette smoke could be made to look like it CURES cancer, thanks to fraudulent science and corrupt researchers...)

Thus, if the FDA were to follow its own rules, it would have to ban tobacco outright, considering it an "unapproved drug" and raid all the tobacco companies, confiscating their inventory and dragging them into court just like the FDA does with diet pills companies or cherry growers.

Of course, the FDA could decide to selectively NOT enforce its own rules against tobacco companies, but that puts the agency in an even worse position of making an exception on its drug enforcement policy, singling out the most dangerous "drug" ever created as one that suspiciously escapes regulatory action. That would make the FDA look like even more of a regulatory failure than it does already, calling into question whether the FDA simply bases its regulatory decisions on the size and influence of the corporation affected rather than genuine public safety.

Because, let's face it: Cigarettes will kill you. There's no debate anymore. Even the doctors -- who are the slowest people in the world to accept new ideas -- are on board with this one. Sure, it took them a few decades to stop running Big Tobacco ads in the Journal of the American Medical Association, and doctors used to take money from the tobacco companies to say cigarettes are "Recommended by doctors," but those days are long gone. Today, virtually everyone agrees smoking cigarettes is one of the most dangerous activities a consumer can engage in when it comes to health.

So how on Earth, then, could the FDA allow cigarettes to continue to be sold at all? If it enforces its own rules, it would simply have to ban cigarettes altogether.

And I say banning cigarettes outright is a huge mistake. Here's why:

Why a ban on cigarettes is a threat to your freedom

Now, I'm the first to say that it would be great if everybody in the country stopped smoking cigarettes. I hate the things. I've watched numerous family members die from cancers that were no doubt caused by cigarette smoke, so I have every reason to support any reasonable effort to outlaw them.

Except I don't believe government should be in the business of telling consumers what they can and can't smoke. If someone wants to light up and kill themselves in their own living room, go right ahead! I just don't think the rest of the taxpayers should have to pay for their health care!

Yep, you heard me right: Don't ban cigarettes, just ban government-funded health care benefits to people who choose to smoke (make them buy their own smokers' health insurance). After all, if they want to commit suicide with tobacco, why should the taxpayers pay for their cancer treatments, hospital stays and artificial lungs? Every time someone lights up a cigarette, they're creating a cost burden to society -- a burden paid for by people like you and me who actually take care of our health. Thus, their smoking steals money from OUR pockets.

Non-smokers are subsidizing the disastrous health care costs of smokers, and I think it's time we stopped. After all, if people want to kill themselves with cigarettes, why should we interfere with health care services that try to save their lives? Shouldn't we just give them the freedom to die the way they've chosen by smoking cigarettes in the first place? (If you really believe in freedom, you see, then you also believe in the freedom for people to die the way they choose, and some people choose to die from cancer. If that's the way they want to live and die, that's their choice!)
Use economic incentives to help people quit smoking

While I recommend we stop providing taxpayer-funded health care services for people who smoke, I think we should also offer health care service incentives to help people quit smoking. For example, stop-smoking seminars, hypnosis programs, and other educational efforts should be offered for free (paid for with taxpayer dollars), and anyone who quits smoking should be openly accepted back onto government-funded health care programs. (There are blood tests that can easily detect nicotine and other cigarette chemicals in the blood...)

We should provide economic incentives for people to stop smoking while putting in place severe economic penalties for those who continue to smoke. That's the smarter way to keep individual liberty intact while encouraging consumers to take responsibility for their own behaviors. Education programs combined with appropriately-structured economic incentives will drive millions of Americans away from cigarettes without taking away consumer freedoms.

-Mike Adams

Additional Source: CDC Tobacco Related Mortality Statistics