ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive

SATURDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- You can help lower your odds of becoming an unfortunate highway statistic this summer by making sure you are rested before you hit the road, says the National Sleep Foundation.

A recent poll by the nonprofit organization found that 54 percent of Americans say they have driven drowsy at least once in the previous year, while more than one-quarter say they do so at least once a month.

"When Americans get behind the wheel, we hope they'll recognize warning signs for when they're too tired to drive," said David M. Cloud, the foundations chief executive officer, in a news release issued by his organization. "Understanding crucial warning signs and countermeasures are key to preventing sleep-related crashes."

Warning signs of sleepiness at the wheel include the obvious, such as frequent yawning, trouble keeping your head upright and the feeling of heavy eyelids or excessive blinking, but also can include trouble staying in your lane and being unable to recall the last few miles driven.

To help avoid a potentially fatal situation, the foundation recommends:

* Getting at least seven to nine hours of sleep the night before a long drive.
* Leave plenty of time to get to your destination. Avoid having to drive long stretches without a break or during a period of time when you would normally be sleeping.
* Stop the car and take a break from behind the wheel every 100 miles or every two hours.
* Don't drive alone. Take along a friend who can split the driving with you. When not driving, the other person can help keep lookout for warning signs of drowsiness in the driver.
* Don't drink alcohol or take medication that could increase sleepiness or hamper your driving ability.

If you do start to feel sleepy, pull over to a safe place and take a 15- to 20-minute nap. Remember that while caffeine can help keep you awake, the liquid form in coffee or other drinks takes about 20 to 30 minutes to take effect, so having some before a short nap can give you a double boost.

SOURCES: National Sleep Foundation, news release, June 2009 Published on: June 13, 2009