ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
Eat Light - Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Run for Your Life
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
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Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive

SATURDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- You can help lower your odds of becoming an unfortunate highway statistic this summer by making sure you are rested before you hit the road, says the National Sleep Foundation.

A recent poll by the nonprofit organization found that 54 percent of Americans say they have driven drowsy at least once in the previous year, while more than one-quarter say they do so at least once a month.

"When Americans get behind the wheel, we hope they'll recognize warning signs for when they're too tired to drive," said David M. Cloud, the foundations chief executive officer, in a news release issued by his organization. "Understanding crucial warning signs and countermeasures are key to preventing sleep-related crashes."

Warning signs of sleepiness at the wheel include the obvious, such as frequent yawning, trouble keeping your head upright and the feeling of heavy eyelids or excessive blinking, but also can include trouble staying in your lane and being unable to recall the last few miles driven.

To help avoid a potentially fatal situation, the foundation recommends:

* Getting at least seven to nine hours of sleep the night before a long drive.
* Leave plenty of time to get to your destination. Avoid having to drive long stretches without a break or during a period of time when you would normally be sleeping.
* Stop the car and take a break from behind the wheel every 100 miles or every two hours.
* Don't drive alone. Take along a friend who can split the driving with you. When not driving, the other person can help keep lookout for warning signs of drowsiness in the driver.
* Don't drink alcohol or take medication that could increase sleepiness or hamper your driving ability.

If you do start to feel sleepy, pull over to a safe place and take a 15- to 20-minute nap. Remember that while caffeine can help keep you awake, the liquid form in coffee or other drinks takes about 20 to 30 minutes to take effect, so having some before a short nap can give you a double boost.

SOURCES: National Sleep Foundation, news release, June 2009 Published on: June 13, 2009