ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
Any Old Cane Won't Do
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive

SATURDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- You can help lower your odds of becoming an unfortunate highway statistic this summer by making sure you are rested before you hit the road, says the National Sleep Foundation.

A recent poll by the nonprofit organization found that 54 percent of Americans say they have driven drowsy at least once in the previous year, while more than one-quarter say they do so at least once a month.

"When Americans get behind the wheel, we hope they'll recognize warning signs for when they're too tired to drive," said David M. Cloud, the foundations chief executive officer, in a news release issued by his organization. "Understanding crucial warning signs and countermeasures are key to preventing sleep-related crashes."

Warning signs of sleepiness at the wheel include the obvious, such as frequent yawning, trouble keeping your head upright and the feeling of heavy eyelids or excessive blinking, but also can include trouble staying in your lane and being unable to recall the last few miles driven.

To help avoid a potentially fatal situation, the foundation recommends:

* Getting at least seven to nine hours of sleep the night before a long drive.
* Leave plenty of time to get to your destination. Avoid having to drive long stretches without a break or during a period of time when you would normally be sleeping.
* Stop the car and take a break from behind the wheel every 100 miles or every two hours.
* Don't drive alone. Take along a friend who can split the driving with you. When not driving, the other person can help keep lookout for warning signs of drowsiness in the driver.
* Don't drink alcohol or take medication that could increase sleepiness or hamper your driving ability.

If you do start to feel sleepy, pull over to a safe place and take a 15- to 20-minute nap. Remember that while caffeine can help keep you awake, the liquid form in coffee or other drinks takes about 20 to 30 minutes to take effect, so having some before a short nap can give you a double boost.

SOURCES: National Sleep Foundation, news release, June 2009 Published on: June 13, 2009