ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
CAREGIVING
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Eating your way to Good Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
The Unmedicated Mind
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
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Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive

SATURDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- You can help lower your odds of becoming an unfortunate highway statistic this summer by making sure you are rested before you hit the road, says the National Sleep Foundation.

A recent poll by the nonprofit organization found that 54 percent of Americans say they have driven drowsy at least once in the previous year, while more than one-quarter say they do so at least once a month.

"When Americans get behind the wheel, we hope they'll recognize warning signs for when they're too tired to drive," said David M. Cloud, the foundations chief executive officer, in a news release issued by his organization. "Understanding crucial warning signs and countermeasures are key to preventing sleep-related crashes."

Warning signs of sleepiness at the wheel include the obvious, such as frequent yawning, trouble keeping your head upright and the feeling of heavy eyelids or excessive blinking, but also can include trouble staying in your lane and being unable to recall the last few miles driven.

To help avoid a potentially fatal situation, the foundation recommends:

* Getting at least seven to nine hours of sleep the night before a long drive.
* Leave plenty of time to get to your destination. Avoid having to drive long stretches without a break or during a period of time when you would normally be sleeping.
* Stop the car and take a break from behind the wheel every 100 miles or every two hours.
* Don't drive alone. Take along a friend who can split the driving with you. When not driving, the other person can help keep lookout for warning signs of drowsiness in the driver.
* Don't drink alcohol or take medication that could increase sleepiness or hamper your driving ability.

If you do start to feel sleepy, pull over to a safe place and take a 15- to 20-minute nap. Remember that while caffeine can help keep you awake, the liquid form in coffee or other drinks takes about 20 to 30 minutes to take effect, so having some before a short nap can give you a double boost.

SOURCES: National Sleep Foundation, news release, June 2009 Published on: June 13, 2009