ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive

SATURDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- You can help lower your odds of becoming an unfortunate highway statistic this summer by making sure you are rested before you hit the road, says the National Sleep Foundation.

A recent poll by the nonprofit organization found that 54 percent of Americans say they have driven drowsy at least once in the previous year, while more than one-quarter say they do so at least once a month.

"When Americans get behind the wheel, we hope they'll recognize warning signs for when they're too tired to drive," said David M. Cloud, the foundations chief executive officer, in a news release issued by his organization. "Understanding crucial warning signs and countermeasures are key to preventing sleep-related crashes."

Warning signs of sleepiness at the wheel include the obvious, such as frequent yawning, trouble keeping your head upright and the feeling of heavy eyelids or excessive blinking, but also can include trouble staying in your lane and being unable to recall the last few miles driven.

To help avoid a potentially fatal situation, the foundation recommends:

* Getting at least seven to nine hours of sleep the night before a long drive.
* Leave plenty of time to get to your destination. Avoid having to drive long stretches without a break or during a period of time when you would normally be sleeping.
* Stop the car and take a break from behind the wheel every 100 miles or every two hours.
* Don't drive alone. Take along a friend who can split the driving with you. When not driving, the other person can help keep lookout for warning signs of drowsiness in the driver.
* Don't drink alcohol or take medication that could increase sleepiness or hamper your driving ability.

If you do start to feel sleepy, pull over to a safe place and take a 15- to 20-minute nap. Remember that while caffeine can help keep you awake, the liquid form in coffee or other drinks takes about 20 to 30 minutes to take effect, so having some before a short nap can give you a double boost.

SOURCES: National Sleep Foundation, news release, June 2009 Published on: June 13, 2009