ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable

FRIDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- A simpler, less costly method of diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is as effective as the traditional protocol that relies on specialist physicians and sleep studies, according to Australian researchers.

People with OSA experience 20 to 30 or more breathing interruptions an hour while they sleep. The condition, which may affect as many as 20 million to 30 million American adults, can cause cardiovascular problems, hypertension and other health issues. Daytime drowsiness caused by OSA also increases the risk of traffic crashes and workplace accidents.

In a study of almost 200 people with moderate to severe OSA, the Australian team compared the simplified diagnosis and treatment approach, which uses experienced nurses, home ambulatory diagnosis and auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines, to the traditional approach.

People in the nurse-led group had an average of 0.18 physician consultations, compared with an average of 2.36 consultations in the physician-led group. There were no significant differences in outcomes, including levels of sleepiness, quality of life measures, ability to do maze tasks and CPAP adherence.

Diagnosis and treatment of people in the nurse-led group cost an average of $722 less than it did in the physician-led group.

"The main finding of the study was that the simplified model of care was not inferior to the usual physician-led, hospital-based model," Nick A. Antic, of the Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, said in an American Thoracic Society news release.

"While we were not surprised at this finding, we were very pleased as it indicates a robust new avenue for providing better access to sleep services for those with moderate-severe OSA in a timely yet cost-effective fashion without sacrificing patient outcomes," he said.

The study, published in the second issue for March of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, suggested that this simplified method could improve access to OSA diagnosis and treatment.

"In Western countries, the waiting lists for sleep medicine service are often very long," Antic said. "In developing countries, there may be no sleep medicine services at all in many areas."

Edward Grandi, executive director of the American Sleep Apnea Association, said in the news release that the "approach could benefit a significant number of the less-complicated apnea cases that are currently untreated due to cost constraints."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about sleep apnea.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, March 6, 2009

Last Updated: March 06, 2009

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