ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Be Healthy, Spend Less
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable

FRIDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- A simpler, less costly method of diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is as effective as the traditional protocol that relies on specialist physicians and sleep studies, according to Australian researchers.

People with OSA experience 20 to 30 or more breathing interruptions an hour while they sleep. The condition, which may affect as many as 20 million to 30 million American adults, can cause cardiovascular problems, hypertension and other health issues. Daytime drowsiness caused by OSA also increases the risk of traffic crashes and workplace accidents.

In a study of almost 200 people with moderate to severe OSA, the Australian team compared the simplified diagnosis and treatment approach, which uses experienced nurses, home ambulatory diagnosis and auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines, to the traditional approach.

People in the nurse-led group had an average of 0.18 physician consultations, compared with an average of 2.36 consultations in the physician-led group. There were no significant differences in outcomes, including levels of sleepiness, quality of life measures, ability to do maze tasks and CPAP adherence.

Diagnosis and treatment of people in the nurse-led group cost an average of $722 less than it did in the physician-led group.

"The main finding of the study was that the simplified model of care was not inferior to the usual physician-led, hospital-based model," Nick A. Antic, of the Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, said in an American Thoracic Society news release.

"While we were not surprised at this finding, we were very pleased as it indicates a robust new avenue for providing better access to sleep services for those with moderate-severe OSA in a timely yet cost-effective fashion without sacrificing patient outcomes," he said.

The study, published in the second issue for March of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, suggested that this simplified method could improve access to OSA diagnosis and treatment.

"In Western countries, the waiting lists for sleep medicine service are often very long," Antic said. "In developing countries, there may be no sleep medicine services at all in many areas."

Edward Grandi, executive director of the American Sleep Apnea Association, said in the news release that the "approach could benefit a significant number of the less-complicated apnea cases that are currently untreated due to cost constraints."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about sleep apnea.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, March 6, 2009

Last Updated: March 06, 2009

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