ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Holistic Dentistry-My View
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
The Raw Food Diet
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable

FRIDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- A simpler, less costly method of diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is as effective as the traditional protocol that relies on specialist physicians and sleep studies, according to Australian researchers.

People with OSA experience 20 to 30 or more breathing interruptions an hour while they sleep. The condition, which may affect as many as 20 million to 30 million American adults, can cause cardiovascular problems, hypertension and other health issues. Daytime drowsiness caused by OSA also increases the risk of traffic crashes and workplace accidents.

In a study of almost 200 people with moderate to severe OSA, the Australian team compared the simplified diagnosis and treatment approach, which uses experienced nurses, home ambulatory diagnosis and auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines, to the traditional approach.

People in the nurse-led group had an average of 0.18 physician consultations, compared with an average of 2.36 consultations in the physician-led group. There were no significant differences in outcomes, including levels of sleepiness, quality of life measures, ability to do maze tasks and CPAP adherence.

Diagnosis and treatment of people in the nurse-led group cost an average of $722 less than it did in the physician-led group.

"The main finding of the study was that the simplified model of care was not inferior to the usual physician-led, hospital-based model," Nick A. Antic, of the Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, said in an American Thoracic Society news release.

"While we were not surprised at this finding, we were very pleased as it indicates a robust new avenue for providing better access to sleep services for those with moderate-severe OSA in a timely yet cost-effective fashion without sacrificing patient outcomes," he said.

The study, published in the second issue for March of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, suggested that this simplified method could improve access to OSA diagnosis and treatment.

"In Western countries, the waiting lists for sleep medicine service are often very long," Antic said. "In developing countries, there may be no sleep medicine services at all in many areas."

Edward Grandi, executive director of the American Sleep Apnea Association, said in the news release that the "approach could benefit a significant number of the less-complicated apnea cases that are currently untreated due to cost constraints."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about sleep apnea.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, March 6, 2009

Last Updated: March 06, 2009

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