ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims

TUESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- It's a potentially lethal gas, but small amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) may help prevent brain damage after a stroke, Johns Hopkins researchers report.

CO, a colorless, odorless gas that can cause organ damage and death, is found in combustion fumes, such as those made by heating systems, vehicles and gas ranges. In enclosed or semi-enclosed places with poor ventilation, CO can build up and pose a serious threat.

The Hopkins team found that low amounts of inhaled carbon monoxide reduced brain damage by as much as 62.2 percent in mice with strokes induced by briefly blocking an artery to one side of the brain. The researchers believe that CO can protect nerve cells from damage.

"CO is made naturally by the body and can serve a protective function under various circumstances. The idea for our experiment was to see if external CO could have a similar effect," study author Sylvain Dor, an associate professor in the department of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, said in a Hopkins news release.

After strokes were induced in the mice, they were exposed to either 125 parts per million (ppm), 250 ppm of CO, or air. Each group of mice was tested for post-stroke brain damage and function, mainly by observing their running patterns and reactions to certain stimuli.

Brain damage in the side of the brain where blood supply was cut off was 49.9 percent in mice exposed only to air, 33.9 percent in mice exposed to 125 ppm of CO, and 18.8 percent in mice exposed to 250 ppm of CO. Compared to those exposed only to air, the mice exposed to CO had significantly better neurological function test scores.

The protective effect was evident in mice treated at both one and three hours after stroke. This is an important point, because "many stroke victims will not receive immediate treatment," Dor said.

The researchers said CO's protective effect may be due to:

* Its ability to dilate blood vessels, which increases blood flow.
* Its anti-inflammatory properties, which prevent cell death by inflammation.
* Its capacity to reduce water in the brain. Excessive water in the brain increases intracranial pressure, which kills brain cells.

The study was published in the Dec. 15 online issue of Neurotoxicity Research.

Each year in the United States, about 700,000 people have a stroke. Of those, 87 percent suffer an ischemic stroke, caused by a blocked artery.

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about carbon monoxide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 15, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com