ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers

Researchers report that adding certain spices to your burgers before tossing them on the grill this summer will not only add to the flavor of the meat, but they can also cut the risk of cancer long associated with the cooking of beef.

Scientists at Kansas State University (KSU) found that three spices in particular -- fingerroot, rosemary and tumeric -- seem to direct the greatest amount of antioxidant activity towards preventing the formation of heterocyclic amines (HCAs). HCAs, they note, are the cancer-causing compounds that are produced when foods such as beef are barbecued, grilled, broiled or fried.

Specifically, the three spices appeared to cut back on HCA production by upwards of 40 percent, the team observed, thereby significantly reducing the HCA-associated risk for developing colorectal, stomach, lung, pancreatic, mammary and prostate cancers.

"Cooked beef tends to develop more HCAs than other kinds of cooked meats such as pork and chicken," KSU food chemistry professor J. Scott Smith noted in a news release. "Cooked beef patties appear to be the cooked meat with the highest mutagenic activity and may be the most important source of HCAs in the human diet."

Therefore Smith and his colleagues looked into the HCA-inhibiting potential of six spices: cumin, coriander seeds, galangal, fingerroot, rosemary and tumeric.

Of all those investigated, rosemary came out on top as the strongest protector against HCA.

The authors suggested that consumers integrate these spices into their menus when appropriate, noting that some, such as rosemary, come in an extract form that has demonstrated HCA inhibition of 61 percent to 79 percent.

They pointed out that spicing allows for the sort of high-temperature cooking (above 352 degrees Farenheit) that is typically recommended for safe grilling, while at the same time blocking the increased HCA production that is known to occur when the flames intensify.

Smith and his team plan further research to see what other marinades and powders might do by way of HCA curtailment -- they noted that earlier work has shown that marinating steaks with particular herbs and spices effectively lowers HCA production.

SOURCES: Food Safety Consortium, May 18, 2010, news release. Published on: May 20, 2010