ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Eating your way to Good Health
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Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain

(HealthDay News) -- Children who experience frequent stomach aches can use their imagination to reduce their pain, new study findings suggest.

The study included 34 participants, aged 6 to 15 years, with functional abdominal pain, which is a persistent pain with no identifiable underlying disease. All the children received standard medical care, but 19 also received eight weeks of guided imagery therapy, which is similar to self-hypnosis.

The audio recordings for the guided imagery therapy consisted of four bi-weekly, 20-minute sessions and 10-minute daily sessions. The therapy offered the children suggestions and imagery for reducing abdominal discomfort. For example, in one session they were told to imagine a special shiny object melting in their hand. They then placed the hand on their abdomen, spreading warmth and light from the hand into the belly in order to create a protective barrier that prevents anything from irritating the belly.

The children in the guided imagery group were almost three times more likely to experience improvement in their abdominal pain than those who received standard treatment alone, the researchers found. The benefits of the guided imagery lasted for six months after the end of the sessions.

"What is especially exciting about our study is that children can clearly reduce their abdominal pain a lot on their own with guidance from audio recordings, and they get much better results that way than from medical care," study lead author Miranda van Tilburg, an assistant professor in the gastroenterology and hepatology division of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and a member of the UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, said in a university news release.

"Such self-administered treatment is, of course, very inexpensive and can be used in addition to other treatments, which potentially opens the door for easily enhancing treatment outcomes for a lot of children suffering from frequent stomach aches," she added.

The study appears in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics.

SOURCES: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, news release, Oct. 12, 2009 Published on: October 13, 2009