ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
CANCER
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Add your Article

Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth

(HealthDay News) -- Compounds derived from two spices -- pepper and turmeric -- could help prevent breast cancer by limiting the growth of stem cells that promote tumor growth, a new study shows.

When curcumin (from turmeric) and piperine (from black peppers) were applied to breast cells in the laboratory, the number of stem cells decreased, but there was no change in normal cells, say researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The study appears online in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

"If we can limit the number of stem cells, we can limit the number of cells with potential to form tumors," the study's lead author, Dr. Madhuri Kakarala, a clinical lecturer in internal medicine at Michigan's medical school and a research investigator at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, said in a university news release.

The researchers indicated that the finding that curcumin and piperine are effective against stem cells but not toxic to normal breast tissue has important implications for women.

"Women at high risk of breast cancer right now can choose to take the drugs tamoxifen or raloxifene for prevention, but most women won't take these drugs because there is too much toxicity," Kakarala said. "The concept that dietary compounds can help is attractive, and curcumin and piperine appear to have very low toxicity."

Previous studies have looked at the two dietary compounds as potential cancer treatments, but this was the first to suggest that they may prevent cancer by targeting stem cells.

The finding came with a warning, however. The compounds were tested only in a laboratory and not in people, and the researchers cautioned against anyone adding curcumin or piperine supplements to their diets.

SOURCES: University of Michigan, news release, Dec. 8, 2009 Published on: December 11, 2009