ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
CAREGIVING
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
Go To Work But Skip The Car
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Spices may do more than flavor your food: New research suggests a shake of this and a pinch of that could also boost the health of diabetics.

Researchers bought 24 herbs and spices and found that many appear to have the power to inhibit tissue damage and inflammation brought on by high blood-sugar levels in the body.

The study didn't examine the direct effects of spices on diabetics. Also, spices are typically used in small amounts, making it unclear if those who eat them would get much benefit.

Still, "this gives people a tool to work with in terms of keeping their health as they want it to be," said study co-author James Hargrove, an associate professor at the University of Georgia.

Hargrove and his colleagues were intrigued by spices because they're rich in antioxidants, which are thought to protect cells from damage. "One can put a lot of antioxidant power into meals by using spices" without making people fatter, he said. "Because of the way they're prepared, herbs and spices tend to have low calorie contents."

In addition, spices are cheaper than many other food products, he said.

The researchers decided to look into the anti-inflammatory properties of spices. "We said, 'Let's just go to Wal-Mart, get all the McCormick brand spices we can find, and check those. That was as complicated as our study design was."

The findings appear in a recent issue of the Journal of Medicinal Food.

In laboratory tests, the researchers found that many of the spices and extracts appeared to inhibit a process known as glycation, which has been linked to inflammation and tissue damage in diabetics.

The spices that seemed most likely to help diabetics included cloves, cinnamon (previously pegged as a possible blood-sugar reducer), allspice, apple pie spice and pumpkin pie spice, Hargrove said. Top herbs included marjoram, sage and thyme.

Other spices and herbs were "still rich compared to other foods" when it comes to the effect, he said.

Lona Sandon, national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, said that while research does suggest that spices are high in antioxidants and may reduce blood-sugar levels, it's difficult to make recommendations about how much to use.

Even so, "I say add as much herbs and spices as your taste buds and tummy can take," she said. "They add flavor and fun to foods without adding calories or fat. Their potential for promoting health outweighs any risks, unless, of course, you have an allergy to a particular spice."

More information

Learn about the history of spices from the University of California at Los Angeles.



SOURCES: James Hargrove, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens; Lona Sandon, ME.d., R.D., assistant professor, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, and national spokeswoman, American Dietetic Association, Dallas; June 2008, Journal of Medicinal Food

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com