ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children

SUNDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The current standard screening test for prediabetes in children often fails to detect the condition, Canadian researchers contend.

Ironically, the findings are from a study group of 172 obese children -- ages 5 to 17 -- who joined a program to help them slim down to a healthy weight.

The standard diabetes test for children is the fasting plasma (blood) glucose test, but it identified almost three times fewer children with diabetes than the glucose stress test, also called the oral glucose tolerance test. The glucose stress test takes longer, because blood is taken from the patient after fasting and again two hours after drinking a sugary solution.

Using the fasting blood glucose test, the researchers found that only 8 percent of the children in the study met the diagnostic criteria for prediabetes. But the glucose stress test indicated that 25 percent of the children had prediabetes.

"A large proportion of the children with prediabetes would not have had their condition recognized," lead author Dr. Katherine Morrison, of the pediatrics department at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, said in a prepared statement.

The researchers also found the fasting blood glucose test identified metabolic syndrome in only 5.2 percent of the children, while the glucose stress test detected metabolic syndrome in 12.8 percent of the children. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors (including high blood sugar) for diabetes and heart disease.

The findings were expected to be presented over the weekend at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in San Francisco.

"Prediabetes and metabolic syndrome are common in obese children but are not readily identified with the currently recommended test. They require a glucose stress test," Morrison said.

Prediabetes and metabolic syndrome often cause no obvious symptoms, she added. Early detection is important, because changes in diet, regular exercise and moderate weight loss can help prevent or delay diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Added time, inconvenience and cost are among the reasons why the glucose stress test isn't typically used in children.

"But this research suggests that the recommended test for screening obese children for prediabetes and metabolic syndrome should be changed," Morrison said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about insulin resistance and prediabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Endocrine Society, news release, June 15, 2008

Last Updated: June 15, 2008

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