ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Tune Up Your Health With Music
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
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'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children

SUNDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The current standard screening test for prediabetes in children often fails to detect the condition, Canadian researchers contend.

Ironically, the findings are from a study group of 172 obese children -- ages 5 to 17 -- who joined a program to help them slim down to a healthy weight.

The standard diabetes test for children is the fasting plasma (blood) glucose test, but it identified almost three times fewer children with diabetes than the glucose stress test, also called the oral glucose tolerance test. The glucose stress test takes longer, because blood is taken from the patient after fasting and again two hours after drinking a sugary solution.

Using the fasting blood glucose test, the researchers found that only 8 percent of the children in the study met the diagnostic criteria for prediabetes. But the glucose stress test indicated that 25 percent of the children had prediabetes.

"A large proportion of the children with prediabetes would not have had their condition recognized," lead author Dr. Katherine Morrison, of the pediatrics department at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, said in a prepared statement.

The researchers also found the fasting blood glucose test identified metabolic syndrome in only 5.2 percent of the children, while the glucose stress test detected metabolic syndrome in 12.8 percent of the children. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors (including high blood sugar) for diabetes and heart disease.

The findings were expected to be presented over the weekend at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in San Francisco.

"Prediabetes and metabolic syndrome are common in obese children but are not readily identified with the currently recommended test. They require a glucose stress test," Morrison said.

Prediabetes and metabolic syndrome often cause no obvious symptoms, she added. Early detection is important, because changes in diet, regular exercise and moderate weight loss can help prevent or delay diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Added time, inconvenience and cost are among the reasons why the glucose stress test isn't typically used in children.

"But this research suggests that the recommended test for screening obese children for prediabetes and metabolic syndrome should be changed," Morrison said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about insulin resistance and prediabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Endocrine Society, news release, June 15, 2008

Last Updated: June 15, 2008

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