ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment

(HealthDay News) -- Watching your weight does more than protect your health. It also may help fight climate change.

Researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine say that because food production is a major contributor to greenhouse gases, a lean population, such as in Vietnam, consumes about 20 percent less food and produces fewer greenhouse gases than a population in which 40 percent of people are obese, a rate close to that of the United States.

Also, less energy is required to transport slim people, say the researchers, Phil Edwards and Ian Roberts, of the school's Department of Epidemiology and Population Health.

They calculated that a lean population of a billion people would emit 1,000 million tons less transportation-related carbon dioxide equivalents a year than an obese population would emit.

Their research was published April 20 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

"When it comes to food consumption, moving about in a heavy body is like driving around in a gas guzzler," the researchers said. "The heavier our bodies become, the harder and more unpleasant it is to move about in them, and the more dependent we become on our cars. Staying slim is good for health and for the environment."

"We need to be doing a lot more to reverse the global trend toward fatness and recognize it as a key factor in the battle to reduce emissions and slow climate change," they said.

However, they noted that the trend is in the opposite direction. The average body mass index (BMI) is increasing in nearly every country. The average male BMI in England, for instance, increased from 26 to 27.3 between 1994 and 2004, while the average female BMI increased from 25.8 to 26.9.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about weight control.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, news release, April 20, 2009

Last Updated: April 22, 2009

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