ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment

(HealthDay News) -- Watching your weight does more than protect your health. It also may help fight climate change.

Researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine say that because food production is a major contributor to greenhouse gases, a lean population, such as in Vietnam, consumes about 20 percent less food and produces fewer greenhouse gases than a population in which 40 percent of people are obese, a rate close to that of the United States.

Also, less energy is required to transport slim people, say the researchers, Phil Edwards and Ian Roberts, of the school's Department of Epidemiology and Population Health.

They calculated that a lean population of a billion people would emit 1,000 million tons less transportation-related carbon dioxide equivalents a year than an obese population would emit.

Their research was published April 20 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

"When it comes to food consumption, moving about in a heavy body is like driving around in a gas guzzler," the researchers said. "The heavier our bodies become, the harder and more unpleasant it is to move about in them, and the more dependent we become on our cars. Staying slim is good for health and for the environment."

"We need to be doing a lot more to reverse the global trend toward fatness and recognize it as a key factor in the battle to reduce emissions and slow climate change," they said.

However, they noted that the trend is in the opposite direction. The average body mass index (BMI) is increasing in nearly every country. The average male BMI in England, for instance, increased from 26 to 27.3 between 1994 and 2004, while the average female BMI increased from 25.8 to 26.9.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about weight control.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, news release, April 20, 2009

Last Updated: April 22, 2009

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