ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although some believe that certain people are destined to get cancer and nothing can be done to change their fate, that's just not the case, experts say.

Even people who have genes that predispose them to certain types of cancer might be able to reduce their risk by living a healthy lifestyle, they say.

"Between 27 and 49 percent of people think preventing cancer is impossible or highly unlikely," said Karen Collins, a registered dietitian and a nutrition adviser for the American Institute for Cancer Research.

But, she said, the institute has identified three steps people could take to dramatically affect the chances of developing cancer:

* Eat a mostly plant-based diet.
* Maintain a healthy weight.
* Exercise regularly.

"The data is pretty clear that we can make a significant drop in the cancer rate with these three changes," Collins said. "We can prevent about one-third of cancers with these changes. And if you add tobacco prevention, which reduces about 30 percent of cancers, over half of today's cancers could be prevented."

Dr. Virginia Kaklamani, an oncologist who specializes in breast cancer at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, added that "increased weight increases the risk of cancer, and physical activity, regardless of weight, decreases breast cancer risk."

The institute joined with the World Cancer Research Fund to release a report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective, that was prepared by a team of international researchers who reviewed more than 7,000 studies on cancer.

Their recommendations included:

* Weight: Maintain a body mass index (BMI) between 21 and 23 and avoid gaining weight during adulthood. Although a BMI of up to 24.9 is considered normal, the lower end of normal is better for cancer prevention, the report said.
* Exercise: Participate in moderate activity -- brisk walking or something equivalent -- for at least 30 minutes a day. Ideally, though, people are advised to work up to 60 minutes of moderate exercise daily, or 30 minutes of vigorous exercise. The report also advised limiting sedentary activities, such as TV-watching.
* Diet: Eat healthily. That means a diet that consists of mostly plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. The experts recommended avoiding sugary, processed foods and fast foods as much as possible and limiting red meat consumption to no more than 18 ounces a week. Salt consumption should also be restricted to no more than 2.4 grams of salt daily. And, the report advised, limit alcohol consumption to one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men.
* Supplements: Don't rely on them. The cancer-preventing benefits derived from nutrients are believed to come from foods, not from individual supplements. Authors of the report advised against taking supplements.

But Collins stressed that people need to realize that the recommendations weren't an "all or nothing" proposition.

"Some people feel, 'I'm so far away from a healthy weight that I'll never get there, so why try?' " she said. "But every drop toward a healthy weight is a good move, and it's worth it."

And, she said, each healthy change someone makes tends to support another one. "When you're active and at a healthy weight, eating choices become clear, because good foods tend to give you more energy to be physically active," she said.

Kaklamani said that she, too, encourages people to make healthy changes. But she cautioned that the 20 percent or so of women who have a family history of breast cancer might need to do a bit more.

It's vital that these women talk with their doctors about genetic counseling because, in addition to making healthy lifestyle changes, they might need to take more aggressive steps to prevent cancer.

In fact, experts emphasize that everyone with a family history of cancer, of any type, should make sure their doctor is aware of it and should ask whether tests are available to assess their risk of developing that type of cancer.


SOURCES: Karen Collins, M.S., R.D., nutrition adviser, American Institute for Cancer Research, Washington, D.C.; Virginia Kaklamani, M.D., oncologist, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago; American Institute for Cancer Research and World Cancer Research Fund Published on: June 03, 2009