ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although some believe that certain people are destined to get cancer and nothing can be done to change their fate, that's just not the case, experts say.

Even people who have genes that predispose them to certain types of cancer might be able to reduce their risk by living a healthy lifestyle, they say.

"Between 27 and 49 percent of people think preventing cancer is impossible or highly unlikely," said Karen Collins, a registered dietitian and a nutrition adviser for the American Institute for Cancer Research.

But, she said, the institute has identified three steps people could take to dramatically affect the chances of developing cancer:

* Eat a mostly plant-based diet.
* Maintain a healthy weight.
* Exercise regularly.

"The data is pretty clear that we can make a significant drop in the cancer rate with these three changes," Collins said. "We can prevent about one-third of cancers with these changes. And if you add tobacco prevention, which reduces about 30 percent of cancers, over half of today's cancers could be prevented."

Dr. Virginia Kaklamani, an oncologist who specializes in breast cancer at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, added that "increased weight increases the risk of cancer, and physical activity, regardless of weight, decreases breast cancer risk."

The institute joined with the World Cancer Research Fund to release a report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective, that was prepared by a team of international researchers who reviewed more than 7,000 studies on cancer.

Their recommendations included:

* Weight: Maintain a body mass index (BMI) between 21 and 23 and avoid gaining weight during adulthood. Although a BMI of up to 24.9 is considered normal, the lower end of normal is better for cancer prevention, the report said.
* Exercise: Participate in moderate activity -- brisk walking or something equivalent -- for at least 30 minutes a day. Ideally, though, people are advised to work up to 60 minutes of moderate exercise daily, or 30 minutes of vigorous exercise. The report also advised limiting sedentary activities, such as TV-watching.
* Diet: Eat healthily. That means a diet that consists of mostly plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. The experts recommended avoiding sugary, processed foods and fast foods as much as possible and limiting red meat consumption to no more than 18 ounces a week. Salt consumption should also be restricted to no more than 2.4 grams of salt daily. And, the report advised, limit alcohol consumption to one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men.
* Supplements: Don't rely on them. The cancer-preventing benefits derived from nutrients are believed to come from foods, not from individual supplements. Authors of the report advised against taking supplements.

But Collins stressed that people need to realize that the recommendations weren't an "all or nothing" proposition.

"Some people feel, 'I'm so far away from a healthy weight that I'll never get there, so why try?' " she said. "But every drop toward a healthy weight is a good move, and it's worth it."

And, she said, each healthy change someone makes tends to support another one. "When you're active and at a healthy weight, eating choices become clear, because good foods tend to give you more energy to be physically active," she said.

Kaklamani said that she, too, encourages people to make healthy changes. But she cautioned that the 20 percent or so of women who have a family history of breast cancer might need to do a bit more.

It's vital that these women talk with their doctors about genetic counseling because, in addition to making healthy lifestyle changes, they might need to take more aggressive steps to prevent cancer.

In fact, experts emphasize that everyone with a family history of cancer, of any type, should make sure their doctor is aware of it and should ask whether tests are available to assess their risk of developing that type of cancer.


SOURCES: Karen Collins, M.S., R.D., nutrition adviser, American Institute for Cancer Research, Washington, D.C.; Virginia Kaklamani, M.D., oncologist, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago; American Institute for Cancer Research and World Cancer Research Fund Published on: June 03, 2009