ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Whites are more likely than blacks to experience atrial fibrillation, a cause of stroke, even though blacks have a higher prevalence of risk factors such as high blood pressure, new research shows.

About 2.2 million Americans have atrial fibrillation, a heart arrhythmia in which the two upper chambers, or atria, quiver chaotically instead of beating in a normal rhythmic pattern, according to the Heart Rhythm Society.

The less effective pumping action can cause blood to pool and clot in the atria, raising the risk of stroke.

The study proves that race has a direct impact on the incidence of atrial fibrillation, the researchers said. They planned to present their findings Wednesday at the Heart Rhythm Society's annual meeting, in Boston.

Researchers examined data on nearly 200,000 patients who had at least two clinical visits to the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit during 2007. The study included 110,333 whites, 65,657 blacks and 20,114 patients whose race was undefined.

About 42 percent of blacks had hypertension, commonly called high blood pressure, compared to 29 percent of whites. Seventeen percent of blacks were diabetic, compared to 12 percent of whites.

Hypertension and diabetes are risk factors for atrial fibrillation, yet blacks had a 50 percent lower prevalence of atrial fibrillation. About 1.2 percent of blacks had atrial fibrillation, compared to 2.5 percent of whites.

"Our results confirm what previous, smaller studies have suggested about African Americans and a lower prevalence of AF [atrial fibrillation]," said study author Dr. Kan Fang. "What is truly fascinating about our findings is that African Americans can have significant risk factors for AF, even higher than those of Caucasian patients, yet have a lower occurrence."

Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common cardiac arrhythmias in the country. Risk factors include being male and/or older, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

More information

The Heart Rhythm Society has more on atrial fibrillation.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Heart Rhythm Society, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com