ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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Subway Defibrillators Save Lives

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) --The use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in public places such as subways can save lives, new research from Germany shows.

A study of AEDs installed in Munich subways found they saved the lives of 12 people suffering heart attacks since the AEDs' installation in 2001. The defibrillators are increasingly common in public facilities, office buildings and transit stations across the United States and Europe.

The results of the study, the first to look at publicly accessible AEDs, were to be presented May 13 at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society's annual scientific session in Boston.

The 44 defibrillators installed at 37 Munich stations come with written instructions and use voice and visual prompts to instruct would-be rescuers how to use them. They can only be operated after alerting emergency personal.

During the study, stored data in the AED were collected and analyzed after each use. Over 7.5 years, AEDs were used in 17 patients. Of 14 people having heart attacks, 12 -- 86 percent -- were resuscitated and admitted to the hospital. Three patients suffered other causes for collapse, and the device delivered no shock.

Eight (57 percent) were discharged from hospital without neurologic damage. Ventricular fibrillation, a severely abnormal heart rhythm, was the initial recording in 10 patients, eight of whom survived without neurologic damage.

One shock was inadequately delivered by the defibrillator operator. On all other occasions, defibrillators were operated adequately, and no technical malfunctions were observed, despite the strong electromagnetic field caused by the subway operation.

Total costs of the Munich subway resuscitation project were about $242,452, or $30,306 per survivor.

To use an AED, rescuers attach adhesive electrode pads to the victim's chest. Through these electrodes, the AED analyzes the electrical activity of the heart to determine if the heart should be shocked. If the electrodes detect a normal heart rhythm or a rhythm that shouldn't be shocked, the device won't deliver one.

"Systematic use of AEDs in the Munich subway system is highly effective and safe for the acute treatment of patients with cardiac arrest," according to the Heart Rhythm 2009 news release.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on operating an AED.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Heart Rhythm 2009, press release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

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