ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Drink Away Dementia?
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Subway Defibrillators Save Lives

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) --The use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in public places such as subways can save lives, new research from Germany shows.

A study of AEDs installed in Munich subways found they saved the lives of 12 people suffering heart attacks since the AEDs' installation in 2001. The defibrillators are increasingly common in public facilities, office buildings and transit stations across the United States and Europe.

The results of the study, the first to look at publicly accessible AEDs, were to be presented May 13 at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society's annual scientific session in Boston.

The 44 defibrillators installed at 37 Munich stations come with written instructions and use voice and visual prompts to instruct would-be rescuers how to use them. They can only be operated after alerting emergency personal.

During the study, stored data in the AED were collected and analyzed after each use. Over 7.5 years, AEDs were used in 17 patients. Of 14 people having heart attacks, 12 -- 86 percent -- were resuscitated and admitted to the hospital. Three patients suffered other causes for collapse, and the device delivered no shock.

Eight (57 percent) were discharged from hospital without neurologic damage. Ventricular fibrillation, a severely abnormal heart rhythm, was the initial recording in 10 patients, eight of whom survived without neurologic damage.

One shock was inadequately delivered by the defibrillator operator. On all other occasions, defibrillators were operated adequately, and no technical malfunctions were observed, despite the strong electromagnetic field caused by the subway operation.

Total costs of the Munich subway resuscitation project were about $242,452, or $30,306 per survivor.

To use an AED, rescuers attach adhesive electrode pads to the victim's chest. Through these electrodes, the AED analyzes the electrical activity of the heart to determine if the heart should be shocked. If the electrodes detect a normal heart rhythm or a rhythm that shouldn't be shocked, the device won't deliver one.

"Systematic use of AEDs in the Munich subway system is highly effective and safe for the acute treatment of patients with cardiac arrest," according to the Heart Rhythm 2009 news release.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on operating an AED.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Heart Rhythm 2009, press release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

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