ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Subway Defibrillators Save Lives

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) --The use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in public places such as subways can save lives, new research from Germany shows.

A study of AEDs installed in Munich subways found they saved the lives of 12 people suffering heart attacks since the AEDs' installation in 2001. The defibrillators are increasingly common in public facilities, office buildings and transit stations across the United States and Europe.

The results of the study, the first to look at publicly accessible AEDs, were to be presented May 13 at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society's annual scientific session in Boston.

The 44 defibrillators installed at 37 Munich stations come with written instructions and use voice and visual prompts to instruct would-be rescuers how to use them. They can only be operated after alerting emergency personal.

During the study, stored data in the AED were collected and analyzed after each use. Over 7.5 years, AEDs were used in 17 patients. Of 14 people having heart attacks, 12 -- 86 percent -- were resuscitated and admitted to the hospital. Three patients suffered other causes for collapse, and the device delivered no shock.

Eight (57 percent) were discharged from hospital without neurologic damage. Ventricular fibrillation, a severely abnormal heart rhythm, was the initial recording in 10 patients, eight of whom survived without neurologic damage.

One shock was inadequately delivered by the defibrillator operator. On all other occasions, defibrillators were operated adequately, and no technical malfunctions were observed, despite the strong electromagnetic field caused by the subway operation.

Total costs of the Munich subway resuscitation project were about $242,452, or $30,306 per survivor.

To use an AED, rescuers attach adhesive electrode pads to the victim's chest. Through these electrodes, the AED analyzes the electrical activity of the heart to determine if the heart should be shocked. If the electrodes detect a normal heart rhythm or a rhythm that shouldn't be shocked, the device won't deliver one.

"Systematic use of AEDs in the Munich subway system is highly effective and safe for the acute treatment of patients with cardiac arrest," according to the Heart Rhythm 2009 news release.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on operating an AED.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Heart Rhythm 2009, press release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

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