ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Get to Know the Pap Test
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Subway Defibrillators Save Lives

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) --The use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in public places such as subways can save lives, new research from Germany shows.

A study of AEDs installed in Munich subways found they saved the lives of 12 people suffering heart attacks since the AEDs' installation in 2001. The defibrillators are increasingly common in public facilities, office buildings and transit stations across the United States and Europe.

The results of the study, the first to look at publicly accessible AEDs, were to be presented May 13 at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society's annual scientific session in Boston.

The 44 defibrillators installed at 37 Munich stations come with written instructions and use voice and visual prompts to instruct would-be rescuers how to use them. They can only be operated after alerting emergency personal.

During the study, stored data in the AED were collected and analyzed after each use. Over 7.5 years, AEDs were used in 17 patients. Of 14 people having heart attacks, 12 -- 86 percent -- were resuscitated and admitted to the hospital. Three patients suffered other causes for collapse, and the device delivered no shock.

Eight (57 percent) were discharged from hospital without neurologic damage. Ventricular fibrillation, a severely abnormal heart rhythm, was the initial recording in 10 patients, eight of whom survived without neurologic damage.

One shock was inadequately delivered by the defibrillator operator. On all other occasions, defibrillators were operated adequately, and no technical malfunctions were observed, despite the strong electromagnetic field caused by the subway operation.

Total costs of the Munich subway resuscitation project were about $242,452, or $30,306 per survivor.

To use an AED, rescuers attach adhesive electrode pads to the victim's chest. Through these electrodes, the AED analyzes the electrical activity of the heart to determine if the heart should be shocked. If the electrodes detect a normal heart rhythm or a rhythm that shouldn't be shocked, the device won't deliver one.

"Systematic use of AEDs in the Munich subway system is highly effective and safe for the acute treatment of patients with cardiac arrest," according to the Heart Rhythm 2009 news release.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on operating an AED.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Heart Rhythm 2009, press release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

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