ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss

Some of the most common sounds of summer can expose listeners to permanent hearing loss, one researcher warns.

The cautionary note was sounded by David Coffin, director of Ball State University's audiology clinic in Indiana.

Risky noise, he says, can come in the form of the pop of fireworks, the snarls of traffic, the buzz of lawn mowers, or the percussive tones of marching bands.

Such sounds are typically within the range of 90 decibels to 140 decibels, said Coffin, but any noise above 80 decibels can cause long-term hearing damage.

"We are living in a society that gets louder every year," Coffin said in a news release from Ball State. "Now that the weather is warmer, we are exposed to all sorts of sounds that can lead to permanent hearing loss. The average person will wear a helmet when riding a bike, or a seat belt in a vehicle, but doesn't even think about ear protection when going to watch a rock band, a fireworks display, or even an auto race."

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, almost 15 percent of Americans below the age of 19 suffer from some measure of hearing loss.

Signs of hearing loss due to unsafe sound exposure include not being able to comprehend somebody talking from two feet away; hearing muffled speech; experiencing pain or ringing in the ears following exposure; and needing others to speak louder in conversation.

However, Coffin stressed that while hearing loss is not reversible, noise exposure is a serious but preventable problem.

To reduce risk, Coffin advises that people wear ear plugs or alternative forms of hearing protection to buffer the noise pollution of summer.

More information

SOURCES: Ball State University, May 17, 2010, news release Published on: May 22, 2010