ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
EYE CARE, VISION
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Maximize Your Run
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss

Some of the most common sounds of summer can expose listeners to permanent hearing loss, one researcher warns.

The cautionary note was sounded by David Coffin, director of Ball State University's audiology clinic in Indiana.

Risky noise, he says, can come in the form of the pop of fireworks, the snarls of traffic, the buzz of lawn mowers, or the percussive tones of marching bands.

Such sounds are typically within the range of 90 decibels to 140 decibels, said Coffin, but any noise above 80 decibels can cause long-term hearing damage.

"We are living in a society that gets louder every year," Coffin said in a news release from Ball State. "Now that the weather is warmer, we are exposed to all sorts of sounds that can lead to permanent hearing loss. The average person will wear a helmet when riding a bike, or a seat belt in a vehicle, but doesn't even think about ear protection when going to watch a rock band, a fireworks display, or even an auto race."

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, almost 15 percent of Americans below the age of 19 suffer from some measure of hearing loss.

Signs of hearing loss due to unsafe sound exposure include not being able to comprehend somebody talking from two feet away; hearing muffled speech; experiencing pain or ringing in the ears following exposure; and needing others to speak louder in conversation.

However, Coffin stressed that while hearing loss is not reversible, noise exposure is a serious but preventable problem.

To reduce risk, Coffin advises that people wear ear plugs or alternative forms of hearing protection to buffer the noise pollution of summer.

More information

SOURCES: Ball State University, May 17, 2010, news release Published on: May 22, 2010