ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
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Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Unexploded bombs in the oceans leak cancer-causing toxins that are absorbed by marine life and may be transferred to humans who eat seafood, one ecologist warns.

"Unexploded bombs are in the ocean for a variety of reasons -- some were duds that did not explode, others were dumped in the ocean as a means of disposal. And we now know that these munitions are leaking cancer-causing materials and endangering sea life," University of Georgia ecologist James Porter said in a news release.

He collected samples from the eastern end of Vieques island off the coast of Puerto Rico, a land and sea area that was used as a U.S. naval gunnery and bombing range from 1943 to 2003.

Porter found that corals, feather duster worms and sea urchins closest to unexploded bombs and bomb fragments had the highest levels of toxicity.

In areas up to two meters away from an intact bomb or bomb fragments, concentrations of cancer-causing toxins were up to 100,000 times over established safe limits, he said.

Prior studies have found that residents of Vieques have a 23 percent higher cancer rate than those who live on the Puerto Rico mainland. Future research needs "to determine the link from unexploded munitions to marine life to the dinner plate," Porter said.

Removing unexploded munitions from the oceans would eliminate the threat, and there is equipment that can safely accomplish the task, he added.

Porter will present his research next week at the Second International Dialogue on Underwater Munitions in Honolulu.

More information

There's more on cancer and the environment at the U.S. National Cancer Institute.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: University of Georgia, news release, Feb. 18, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 18, 2009

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