ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Tune Up Your Health With Music
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Drink Away Dementia?
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The struggle to keep the pounds off that one has just lost can be aided effectively and inexpensively with a simple five-minute weigh-in with a nurse every couple of weeks.

New Zealand researchers, writing in the medical journal CMAJ, found that the biweekly weigh-in, along with a call from the same nurse during the intervening weeks, helped women maintain their weight loss as well as a more expensive and intensive program using dietitians and exercise specialists.

The study, which followed most of 200 women for two years, randomly divided the participants into one group that had the weigh-ins and supportive phones calls with a nurse and another that followed a more comprehensive diabetes prevention program that included regular exercise programs. At the study's start, all the women -- aged 25 to 70 -- had recently lost at least 5 percent of their total body weight.

While intensive programs used for the one group had already been proven successfully in weight maintenance, "the costs to implement these programs are considerable and well beyond the means of health budgets in many countries," wrote the study authors, from the Edgar National Centre for Diabetes Research in Dunedin, New Zealand.

The authors reported that attendance for weigh-ins was excellent, while the other group did not do nearly as well with showing up for its exercise classes. By the second year of the study, attendance at the exercise program declined even further.

"Many participants reported that the weigh-ins and the enthusiastic support provided by the nurse on those occasions and on the telephone were key determinants of their success," wrote the researchers.

While the authors highly supported hospitals adding nurse-led weigh-in programs, Robert Ross of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, wrote in a related commentary in the same issue of CMAJ that adding such programs may not be possible in places where nurses are in short supply. But, he added, that other people -- including exercise specialists and dietitians -- may be just as effective in such a support-oriented program, as he noted that the nurses used for the study were enthusiastic but not trained in nutrition and exercise.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has more about maintaining a healthy weight.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: CMAJ, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

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