ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating your way to Good Health
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The struggle to keep the pounds off that one has just lost can be aided effectively and inexpensively with a simple five-minute weigh-in with a nurse every couple of weeks.

New Zealand researchers, writing in the medical journal CMAJ, found that the biweekly weigh-in, along with a call from the same nurse during the intervening weeks, helped women maintain their weight loss as well as a more expensive and intensive program using dietitians and exercise specialists.

The study, which followed most of 200 women for two years, randomly divided the participants into one group that had the weigh-ins and supportive phones calls with a nurse and another that followed a more comprehensive diabetes prevention program that included regular exercise programs. At the study's start, all the women -- aged 25 to 70 -- had recently lost at least 5 percent of their total body weight.

While intensive programs used for the one group had already been proven successfully in weight maintenance, "the costs to implement these programs are considerable and well beyond the means of health budgets in many countries," wrote the study authors, from the Edgar National Centre for Diabetes Research in Dunedin, New Zealand.

The authors reported that attendance for weigh-ins was excellent, while the other group did not do nearly as well with showing up for its exercise classes. By the second year of the study, attendance at the exercise program declined even further.

"Many participants reported that the weigh-ins and the enthusiastic support provided by the nurse on those occasions and on the telephone were key determinants of their success," wrote the researchers.

While the authors highly supported hospitals adding nurse-led weigh-in programs, Robert Ross of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, wrote in a related commentary in the same issue of CMAJ that adding such programs may not be possible in places where nurses are in short supply. But, he added, that other people -- including exercise specialists and dietitians -- may be just as effective in such a support-oriented program, as he noted that the nurses used for the study were enthusiastic but not trained in nutrition and exercise.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has more about maintaining a healthy weight.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: CMAJ, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com