ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
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Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States

TUESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Swine flu cases have now been reported in all 50 states, with the total number of people infected probably surpassing 200,000, U.S. health officials said Monday.

"It's accurate to say that there are probably several hundred thousand people that have been impacted by this flu," said Tom Skinner, a spokesman for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "But that's in line with what we would see with seasonal influenza if we had the number of cases we are reporting right now."

And while the outbreak continues to wane, new cases will continue to emerge, Skinner said.

On Monday, the CDC was reporting a total of 10,053 cases in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, including 17 deaths. The agency has said in the past that confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu represent about one in 20 of actual cases, bringing the total number of cases to about 200,000.

Infections with the H1N1 swine flu virus continue to be mild and recovery is fairly quick, as is the case with seasonal flu, officials said. Testing has found that the virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.

What has been different about the swine flu outbreak, Skinner said, is that activity picked up late in the typical flu season. "What was unusual was that in late March into April and late May we saw activity at a higher-than-expected level," he said.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, the CDC's interim deputy director for science and public health program, said last week that the newly identified H1N1 swine flu virus continues to behave much like seasonal H1N1 viruses, which may partly explain why this flu strain affects more younger people. "Seasonal H1N1 often causes more disease in younger people, compared with the other strains that can be more common in older people," she said.

Some older people may have partial immunity to the H1N1 swine flu virus because of possible exposure to another H1N1 flu strain that circulated prior to 1957.

Schuchat said a vaccine for the swine flu virus could be ready in October, if research and testing proceed on pace this summer. Candidate viruses have been shipped to vaccine manufacturers, she said.

It's still not clear whether a swine flu vaccine is needed, Schuchat said. Any decision to move forward would be based on several factors, including the severity and spread of the virus and whether there's a safe and effective vaccine, she said.

During the next few months, scientists will be looking to see if the swine flu virus mutates or becomes resistant to antiviral medications, or is more easily spread among people, Schuchat said. The flu season is winding down in the Northern Hemisphere but is just beginning in the Southern Hemisphere.

Schuchat said there's no way to tell now if the H1N1 virus will be more virulent when -- and if -- it returns to the Northern Hemisphere with the approach of winter.

The World Health Organization said Monday that 53 countries have reported 15,510 cases of H1N1 swine flu, including 99 deaths, most of them in Mexico, where the outbreak began.


SOURCES: Tom Skinner, spokesman, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; May 28, 2009, teleconference with Anne Schuchat, M.D., interim deputy director for science and public health program, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Published on: June 02, 2009