ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Run for Your Life
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States

TUESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Swine flu cases have now been reported in all 50 states, with the total number of people infected probably surpassing 200,000, U.S. health officials said Monday.

"It's accurate to say that there are probably several hundred thousand people that have been impacted by this flu," said Tom Skinner, a spokesman for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "But that's in line with what we would see with seasonal influenza if we had the number of cases we are reporting right now."

And while the outbreak continues to wane, new cases will continue to emerge, Skinner said.

On Monday, the CDC was reporting a total of 10,053 cases in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, including 17 deaths. The agency has said in the past that confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu represent about one in 20 of actual cases, bringing the total number of cases to about 200,000.

Infections with the H1N1 swine flu virus continue to be mild and recovery is fairly quick, as is the case with seasonal flu, officials said. Testing has found that the virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.

What has been different about the swine flu outbreak, Skinner said, is that activity picked up late in the typical flu season. "What was unusual was that in late March into April and late May we saw activity at a higher-than-expected level," he said.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, the CDC's interim deputy director for science and public health program, said last week that the newly identified H1N1 swine flu virus continues to behave much like seasonal H1N1 viruses, which may partly explain why this flu strain affects more younger people. "Seasonal H1N1 often causes more disease in younger people, compared with the other strains that can be more common in older people," she said.

Some older people may have partial immunity to the H1N1 swine flu virus because of possible exposure to another H1N1 flu strain that circulated prior to 1957.

Schuchat said a vaccine for the swine flu virus could be ready in October, if research and testing proceed on pace this summer. Candidate viruses have been shipped to vaccine manufacturers, she said.

It's still not clear whether a swine flu vaccine is needed, Schuchat said. Any decision to move forward would be based on several factors, including the severity and spread of the virus and whether there's a safe and effective vaccine, she said.

During the next few months, scientists will be looking to see if the swine flu virus mutates or becomes resistant to antiviral medications, or is more easily spread among people, Schuchat said. The flu season is winding down in the Northern Hemisphere but is just beginning in the Southern Hemisphere.

Schuchat said there's no way to tell now if the H1N1 virus will be more virulent when -- and if -- it returns to the Northern Hemisphere with the approach of winter.

The World Health Organization said Monday that 53 countries have reported 15,510 cases of H1N1 swine flu, including 99 deaths, most of them in Mexico, where the outbreak began.


SOURCES: Tom Skinner, spokesman, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; May 28, 2009, teleconference with Anne Schuchat, M.D., interim deputy director for science and public health program, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Published on: June 02, 2009