ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
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Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States

TUESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Swine flu cases have now been reported in all 50 states, with the total number of people infected probably surpassing 200,000, U.S. health officials said Monday.

"It's accurate to say that there are probably several hundred thousand people that have been impacted by this flu," said Tom Skinner, a spokesman for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "But that's in line with what we would see with seasonal influenza if we had the number of cases we are reporting right now."

And while the outbreak continues to wane, new cases will continue to emerge, Skinner said.

On Monday, the CDC was reporting a total of 10,053 cases in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, including 17 deaths. The agency has said in the past that confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu represent about one in 20 of actual cases, bringing the total number of cases to about 200,000.

Infections with the H1N1 swine flu virus continue to be mild and recovery is fairly quick, as is the case with seasonal flu, officials said. Testing has found that the virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.

What has been different about the swine flu outbreak, Skinner said, is that activity picked up late in the typical flu season. "What was unusual was that in late March into April and late May we saw activity at a higher-than-expected level," he said.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, the CDC's interim deputy director for science and public health program, said last week that the newly identified H1N1 swine flu virus continues to behave much like seasonal H1N1 viruses, which may partly explain why this flu strain affects more younger people. "Seasonal H1N1 often causes more disease in younger people, compared with the other strains that can be more common in older people," she said.

Some older people may have partial immunity to the H1N1 swine flu virus because of possible exposure to another H1N1 flu strain that circulated prior to 1957.

Schuchat said a vaccine for the swine flu virus could be ready in October, if research and testing proceed on pace this summer. Candidate viruses have been shipped to vaccine manufacturers, she said.

It's still not clear whether a swine flu vaccine is needed, Schuchat said. Any decision to move forward would be based on several factors, including the severity and spread of the virus and whether there's a safe and effective vaccine, she said.

During the next few months, scientists will be looking to see if the swine flu virus mutates or becomes resistant to antiviral medications, or is more easily spread among people, Schuchat said. The flu season is winding down in the Northern Hemisphere but is just beginning in the Southern Hemisphere.

Schuchat said there's no way to tell now if the H1N1 virus will be more virulent when -- and if -- it returns to the Northern Hemisphere with the approach of winter.

The World Health Organization said Monday that 53 countries have reported 15,510 cases of H1N1 swine flu, including 99 deaths, most of them in Mexico, where the outbreak began.


SOURCES: Tom Skinner, spokesman, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; May 28, 2009, teleconference with Anne Schuchat, M.D., interim deputy director for science and public health program, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Published on: June 02, 2009