ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
CANCER
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Add your Article

Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- In a troubling sign that the swine flu outbreak has yet to run its current course in the United States, three New York City public schools were closed Thursday after dozens of flu-like infections surfaced and an assistant principal was in critical condition on a ventilator, according to published reports.

Meanwhile, a woman in Arizona who suffered from a lung condition has apparently become the fourth person with swine flu in the United States to die. The Maricopa County Health Department said Thursday that the woman, in her late 40s, died last week of what seemed to be complications from the swine flu, the Associated Press reported.

The three other people in the United States who have died from the infection also had pre-existing health problems.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Thursday that four students and the assistant principal at a Queens middle school had diagnosed cases of swine flu. More than 50 students went home sick with flu-like symptoms. At another middle school in Queens, more than 200 students were absent Thursday, and dozens more were sick at an elementary school, The New York Times and the AP reported.

The assistant principal reportedly had underlying health problems before he fell ill. The students who have taken sick in this latest round of infections seem to be experiencing mild symptoms, similar to routine flu, as has been the case for most people in the United States touched by the swine flu.

When the outbreak began more than three weeks ago, hundreds of students and staffers at St. Francis Preparatory School, also in Queens, were sickened. Reports at the time said several St. Francis students had spent spring vacation in Cancun, Mexico. Mexico is believed to be the source of the global outbreak that has now infected more than 7,000 people worldwide.

Also Thursday, vaccine manufacturers and other health experts met at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, to plot potential strategies to combat the swine flu virus.

The AP reported that drug companies were ready to start producing a swine flu vaccine, but many questions remain. They include how many doses to produce, particularly in relation to needed doses of seasonal flu vaccine.

The expert group's recommendations will be forwarded to the WHO's director-general, Margaret Chan, who is expected to issue advice to vaccine manufacturers and the World Health Assembly next week, the AP said.

But at least one infectious-disease expert said it was a "foregone conclusion" that drug manufacturers would be told to proceed with a vaccine for swine flu, technically known as H1N1 flu.

"If we don't invest in an H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine, then possibly we could have a reappearance of this virus in a mild, moderate, or catastrophic form and we would have absolutely nothing," said Dr. David Fedson, a vaccine expert and former professor of medicine at the University of Virginia.

One factor complicating a decision is that most flu vaccine companies can only make limited amounts of both seasonal flu vaccine and pandemic vaccine, such as that needed for swine flu, and not at the same time. The producers also can't make large quantities of both types of vaccine because that would exceed manufacturing capacity, the AP said.

Testing has found that the swine flu virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Thursday, the CDC was reporting 4,298 U.S. cases of swine flu in 47 states, and three deaths. For the most part, the infections continue to be mild -- similar to seasonal flu -- and recovery is fairly quick.

The World Health Organization on Friday was reporting 7,520 cases in 34 countries.

The swine flu is a highly unusual mix of swine, bird and human flu viruses. Experts worry that, if the new flu virus mutates, people would have limited immunity to fight the infection.

The CDC is concerned with what will happen as this new virus moves into the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season is about to start. The agency is also preparing for the virus' likely return in the fall to the Northern Hemisphere.

More articles at www.eholistic.com