ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Add your Article

Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- In a troubling sign that the swine flu outbreak has yet to run its current course in the United States, three New York City public schools were closed Thursday after dozens of flu-like infections surfaced and an assistant principal was in critical condition on a ventilator, according to published reports.

Meanwhile, a woman in Arizona who suffered from a lung condition has apparently become the fourth person with swine flu in the United States to die. The Maricopa County Health Department said Thursday that the woman, in her late 40s, died last week of what seemed to be complications from the swine flu, the Associated Press reported.

The three other people in the United States who have died from the infection also had pre-existing health problems.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Thursday that four students and the assistant principal at a Queens middle school had diagnosed cases of swine flu. More than 50 students went home sick with flu-like symptoms. At another middle school in Queens, more than 200 students were absent Thursday, and dozens more were sick at an elementary school, The New York Times and the AP reported.

The assistant principal reportedly had underlying health problems before he fell ill. The students who have taken sick in this latest round of infections seem to be experiencing mild symptoms, similar to routine flu, as has been the case for most people in the United States touched by the swine flu.

When the outbreak began more than three weeks ago, hundreds of students and staffers at St. Francis Preparatory School, also in Queens, were sickened. Reports at the time said several St. Francis students had spent spring vacation in Cancun, Mexico. Mexico is believed to be the source of the global outbreak that has now infected more than 7,000 people worldwide.

Also Thursday, vaccine manufacturers and other health experts met at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, to plot potential strategies to combat the swine flu virus.

The AP reported that drug companies were ready to start producing a swine flu vaccine, but many questions remain. They include how many doses to produce, particularly in relation to needed doses of seasonal flu vaccine.

The expert group's recommendations will be forwarded to the WHO's director-general, Margaret Chan, who is expected to issue advice to vaccine manufacturers and the World Health Assembly next week, the AP said.

But at least one infectious-disease expert said it was a "foregone conclusion" that drug manufacturers would be told to proceed with a vaccine for swine flu, technically known as H1N1 flu.

"If we don't invest in an H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine, then possibly we could have a reappearance of this virus in a mild, moderate, or catastrophic form and we would have absolutely nothing," said Dr. David Fedson, a vaccine expert and former professor of medicine at the University of Virginia.

One factor complicating a decision is that most flu vaccine companies can only make limited amounts of both seasonal flu vaccine and pandemic vaccine, such as that needed for swine flu, and not at the same time. The producers also can't make large quantities of both types of vaccine because that would exceed manufacturing capacity, the AP said.

Testing has found that the swine flu virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Thursday, the CDC was reporting 4,298 U.S. cases of swine flu in 47 states, and three deaths. For the most part, the infections continue to be mild -- similar to seasonal flu -- and recovery is fairly quick.

The World Health Organization on Friday was reporting 7,520 cases in 34 countries.

The swine flu is a highly unusual mix of swine, bird and human flu viruses. Experts worry that, if the new flu virus mutates, people would have limited immunity to fight the infection.

The CDC is concerned with what will happen as this new virus moves into the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season is about to start. The agency is also preparing for the virus' likely return in the fall to the Northern Hemisphere.

More articles at www.eholistic.com