ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Add your Article

Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans

SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- While the official tally of confirmed U.S. swine flu cases topped 4,700 on Friday, experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimate the true number of infections at more than 100,000 nationwide.

Also on Friday, health officials announced two new deaths linked to the H1N1 virus, bringing the nationwide total to five.

"Today we had our fourth death reported from Maricopa County in Arizona," Dr. Daniel Jernigan, from CDC's Influenza Division, said during an afternoon teleconference Friday. "There are more deaths and hospitalizations that we are monitoring," he said.

The Arizona patient, a woman in her late 40s with an underlying lung condition, died last week, the Associated Press reported.

Also on Friday, health officials in Nueces County, Texas, announced that state's third swine flu-related death, an unidentified 33-year-old man with multiple underlying health conditions who died May 5 or 6, according to the AP.

The two new fatalities come after two others in Texas and one in Washington state. All of the victims had underlying health problems besides the flu.

Most cases of swine flu occurring in the United States appear to be mild, health officials said.

In fact, "estimates of the confirmed and probable cases in the United States is probably not the best indicator of transmission at this point," the CDC's Jernigan said. "The outbreak is not localized, but is spreading and appears to be expanding throughout the United States. This is an ongoing public health threat."

It's a little hard to estimate the number of people who may be infected with swine flu, Jernigan said, "but if we had to make an estimate, I would say that the amount of activity we are seeing with our influenza-like illness network is probably upwards of 100,000."

Jernigan said there also seems to be more cases of flu generally in the United States -- both the seasonal and the new H1N1 swine flu -- than is usually seen at this time of the year. "There are 22 U.S. states that are reporting widespread or regional influenza activity, which is something that we would not expect at this time," he said.

In other news, the CDC on Friday lifted its general warning that Americans avoid non-essential travel to Mexico, considered the origin and epicenter of the outbreak. Instead, the warning has been downgraded to a "precaution" that now advises people who might be at high risk for complications from the flu to reconsider travel to Mexico.

But in a troubling sign that the swine flu outbreak has yet to run its current course in the United States, three New York City public schools were closed Thursday after dozens of flu-like infections surfaced and an assistant principal was in critical condition on a ventilator, according to published reports.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said four students and the assistant principal at a Queens middle school had diagnosed cases of swine flu. More than 50 students went home sick Thursday with flu-like symptoms. At another middle school in Queens, more than 200 students were absent Thursday, and dozens more were sick at an elementary school, The New York Times and the AP reported.

The assistant principal reportedly had underlying health problems before he fell ill. The students who have taken sick in this latest round of infections seem to be experiencing mild symptoms, similar to routine flu, as has been the case for most people in the United States touched by the swine flu.

When the outbreak began more than three weeks ago, hundreds of students and staffers at St. Francis Preparatory School, also in Queens, were sickened. Reports at the time said several St. Francis students had spent spring vacation in Cancun, Mexico. Mexico is believed to be the source of the global outbreak that has now infected more than 7,000 people worldwide.

Vaccine manufacturers and other health experts met Thursday at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, to plot potential strategies to combat the swine flu virus.

The AP reported that drug companies were ready to start producing a swine flu vaccine, but many questions remain. They include how many doses to produce, particularly in relation to needed doses of seasonal flu vaccine.

The expert group's recommendations will be forwarded to the WHO's director-general, Margaret Chan, who is expected to issue advice to vaccine manufacturers and the World Health Assembly next week, the AP said.

But at least one infectious-disease expert said it was a "foregone conclusion" that drug manufacturers would be told to proceed with a vaccine for the H1N1 flu.

"If we don't invest in an H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine, then possibly we could have a reappearance of this virus in a mild, moderate, or catastrophic form and we would have absolutely nothing," said Dr. David Fedson, a vaccine expert and former professor of medicine at the University of Virginia.

One factor complicating a decision is that most flu vaccine companies can only make limited amounts of both seasonal flu vaccine and pandemic vaccine, such as that needed for swine flu, and not at the same time. The producers also can't make large quantities of both types of vaccine because that would exceed manufacturing capacity, the AP said.

Testing has found that the swine flu virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.

On Friday, the CDC was reporting 4,714 U.S. cases of swine flu in 47 states, and four deaths. For the most part, the infections continue to be mild -- similar to seasonal flu -- and recovery is fairly quick.

The World Health Organization on Saturday was reporting 8,451 confirmed cases in 36 countries.

The swine flu is a highly unusual mix of swine, bird and human flu viruses. Experts worry that, if the new flu virus mutates, people would have limited immunity to fight the infection.

The CDC is concerned with what will happen as this new virus moves into the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season is about to start. The agency is also preparing for the virus' likely return in the fall to the Northern Hemisphere.

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 15, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
States # of
confirmed and
probable cases Deaths
Alabama

55


Arkansas

2


Arizona

435

1
California
504

Colorado

55


Connecticut

47


Delaware
60

Florida

68


Georgia

18


Hawaii

10


Idaho

5


Illinois

638


Indiana

71


Iowa

66


Kansas

30


Kentucky**

13


Louisiana

57


Maine

14


Maryland

28


Massachusetts
135

Michigan
142

Minnesota

36


Missouri

19


Montana
4

Nebraska

27


Nevada

26


New Hampshire

18


New Jersey

14


New Mexico

68


New York

242


North Carolina

12


North Dakota

2


Ohio
14

Oklahoma

26


Oregon

94


Pennsylvania

47


Rhode Island

8


South Carolina

36


South Dakota

4


Tennessee

74


Texas

506

2
Utah

91


Vermont

1


Virginia

21


Washington

246

1
Washington, D.C.

12


Wisconsin

613


TOTAL*(47)

4,714 cases

4 deaths
*includes the District of Columbia
**One case is resident of Ky. but currently hospitalized in Ga.

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More information

For more on swine flu, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More articles at www.eholistic.com