ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors

(HealthDay News) -- Want to improve that osteoarthritis in your knee? New research suggests that regular Tai Chi exercise can reduce pain and help your knee function better.

"Tai Chi is a mind-body approach that appears to be an applicable treatment for older adults with knee osteoarthritis," Dr. Chenchen Wang, co-author of a study published in the November issue of Arthritis Care & Research, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

In the United States, an estimated 4.3 million adults over 60 suffer from this form of arthritis. As many as half of American adults may develop symptoms by age 85, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported recently.

Wang and colleagues from Tufts University School of Medicine recruited 40 patients, with an average age of 65, who had been diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis.

Half of the group took part in Yang-style Tai Chi sessions for an hour at a time, twice weekly over a period of three months. The Tai Chi session consisted of 10-minutes of self-message and review, a half hour of movement, 10 minutes of breathing exercises and 10 minutes of relaxing.

The other participants took two 60-minute classes per week for three months and learned about issues such as diet and nutrition, and treatments for osteoarthritis. They also stretched for 20 minutes.

Those who practiced Tai Chi had significantly less knee pain than the other group and also reported less depression, more physical function and better overall health.

"Our observations emphasize a need to further evaluate the biologic mechanisms and approaches of Tai Chi to extend its benefits to a broader population," Wang said.

SOURCES: Arthritis Care & Research, news release, Oct. 29, 2009 Published on: October 29, 2009