ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Sleep and Do Better
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
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Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study

(HealthDay News) -- A survey of Chinese adolescents found that teens who are addicted to the Internet are twice as likely to harm themselves as other teens.

The survey of 1,618 students aged 13 to 18 who were living in the Chinese city of Guangzhou in Guandong Province found that about 16 percent said they had harmed themselves in some way within the previous six months; 4.5 percent reported that they'd harmed themselves at least six times during that period.

Self-harm, as defined by the study, included hair pulling, hitting, deliberate burning and pinching.

The researchers, who reported their findings in the Dec. 3 issue of the journal Injury Prevention, noted that about 90 percent of the survey participants were normal users of the Internet, but about 10 percent were moderately addicted and 0.6 percent were severely addicted.

Addicted teens suffered from emotional problems such as depression and nervousness when they weren't online, but felt better when they returned to the Internet, the study authors explained in a news release from the journal's publisher. Addicted teens also fantasized about or were preoccupied by being online.

After adjusting their statistics to account for the potential influence of other factors, such as health problems, the researchers found that the Internet-addicted teens were twice as likely to have harmed themselves. When they did hurt themselves, they did so more seriously than other teens.

SOURCES: BMJ Group, news release, Dec. 3, 2009 Published on: December 03, 2009