ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study

(HealthDay News) -- A survey of Chinese adolescents found that teens who are addicted to the Internet are twice as likely to harm themselves as other teens.

The survey of 1,618 students aged 13 to 18 who were living in the Chinese city of Guangzhou in Guandong Province found that about 16 percent said they had harmed themselves in some way within the previous six months; 4.5 percent reported that they'd harmed themselves at least six times during that period.

Self-harm, as defined by the study, included hair pulling, hitting, deliberate burning and pinching.

The researchers, who reported their findings in the Dec. 3 issue of the journal Injury Prevention, noted that about 90 percent of the survey participants were normal users of the Internet, but about 10 percent were moderately addicted and 0.6 percent were severely addicted.

Addicted teens suffered from emotional problems such as depression and nervousness when they weren't online, but felt better when they returned to the Internet, the study authors explained in a news release from the journal's publisher. Addicted teens also fantasized about or were preoccupied by being online.

After adjusting their statistics to account for the potential influence of other factors, such as health problems, the researchers found that the Internet-addicted teens were twice as likely to have harmed themselves. When they did hurt themselves, they did so more seriously than other teens.

SOURCES: BMJ Group, news release, Dec. 3, 2009 Published on: December 03, 2009