ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Very young children who spent excessive time in child-care facilities or who had insensitive mothers may be more prone to stress in their teen years, a long-term study suggests.

The conclusion is based on a finding, published in the May/June issue of Child Development, that by age 15 these children are more likely to wake up in the morning with lower-than-normal levels of cortisol, a hormone related to stress. Normally, people have high cortisol levels in the morning that gradually decrease as the day continues. The abnormal pattern in these teens, the researcher said, could indicate higher levels of early stress.

The results come from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development in the United States, done with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. For the study, researchers observed the lives of 1,000 children from infancy to mid-adolescence to try to determine how child care in early life affected their development later.

The abnormal cortisol pattern was found more often in the 15-year-olds who, during the first three years of life, spent more time in child-care centers and/or had mothers who were observed to be more insensitive. The findings held regardless of the quality of the child-care facility, the child's gender or ethnicity, the family's income level, the mother's level of education or the sensitivity the parents exhibited to the children as teenagers.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about stress.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Society for Research in Child Development, news release, May 15, 2009

Last Updated: May 21, 2009

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