ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
The Unmedicated Mind
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
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Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies

(HealthDay News) -- Increased exercise, reduced soda consumption and self-weighing are among the most effective weight control strategies for adolescents, a new study shows.

Researchers surveyed 130 adolescents about their weight-control strategies and lifestyle habits. Sixty-two had succeeded in losing weight and 68 had not. The responses were grouped into four categories:

* Healthy weight control behaviors, which included eating fewer calories, increasing exercise, eating less high fat and junk food, drinking less soda, drinking more water, weighing oneself, eating more fruits and vegetables and doing different types of exercise.
* Unhealthy weight control behaviors, which included laxatives, vomiting, diuretics, smoking and fasting.
* Extreme dietary changes, which included use of liquid diet supplements, the Atkins diet, a structured diet, fasting and increasing protein consumption.
* Structured behaviors, which included eating a certain amount of calories, counting calories, recording food intake and working with a professional.

Overall, a higher percentage of participants who lost weight used six or more of the healthy weight control behaviors, compared to those who didn't lose weight. A minority of adolescents who lost weight reported using any of the structured weight control behaviors or extreme dietary changes.

"First of all, our findings provide a glimpse of optimism that adolescents can lose a significant amount of weight and maintain this weight loss," wrote Kerri Boutelle, of the departments of pediatrics and psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, and colleagues.

"Second, our findings suggest that there are no magical solutions, and that behaviors such as eating more fruits and vegetables and eating less fat and decreasing sedentary time seem to offer the most promise for success... Self-weighing may be a helpful monitoring tool for overweight adolescents; in the current study, the largest percentage of adolescents who lost weight reported weighing themselves on a weekly basis, while the largest percentage of adolescents who did not lose weight reported weighing themselves less than monthly. Lastly, unhealthy weight control behaviors were not associated with being in the group that lost weight. Adolescents would benefit from hearing this information from dietitians and other health care providers to prevent development of unhealthy weight control behaviors. Findings from the current study have the potential to guide both future research studies and clinical interventions on obesity in adolescents."

The study appears in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

SOURCES: American Dietetic Association, news release, Dec. 2, 2009 Published on: December 04, 2009