ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies

(HealthDay News) -- Increased exercise, reduced soda consumption and self-weighing are among the most effective weight control strategies for adolescents, a new study shows.

Researchers surveyed 130 adolescents about their weight-control strategies and lifestyle habits. Sixty-two had succeeded in losing weight and 68 had not. The responses were grouped into four categories:

* Healthy weight control behaviors, which included eating fewer calories, increasing exercise, eating less high fat and junk food, drinking less soda, drinking more water, weighing oneself, eating more fruits and vegetables and doing different types of exercise.
* Unhealthy weight control behaviors, which included laxatives, vomiting, diuretics, smoking and fasting.
* Extreme dietary changes, which included use of liquid diet supplements, the Atkins diet, a structured diet, fasting and increasing protein consumption.
* Structured behaviors, which included eating a certain amount of calories, counting calories, recording food intake and working with a professional.

Overall, a higher percentage of participants who lost weight used six or more of the healthy weight control behaviors, compared to those who didn't lose weight. A minority of adolescents who lost weight reported using any of the structured weight control behaviors or extreme dietary changes.

"First of all, our findings provide a glimpse of optimism that adolescents can lose a significant amount of weight and maintain this weight loss," wrote Kerri Boutelle, of the departments of pediatrics and psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, and colleagues.

"Second, our findings suggest that there are no magical solutions, and that behaviors such as eating more fruits and vegetables and eating less fat and decreasing sedentary time seem to offer the most promise for success... Self-weighing may be a helpful monitoring tool for overweight adolescents; in the current study, the largest percentage of adolescents who lost weight reported weighing themselves on a weekly basis, while the largest percentage of adolescents who did not lose weight reported weighing themselves less than monthly. Lastly, unhealthy weight control behaviors were not associated with being in the group that lost weight. Adolescents would benefit from hearing this information from dietitians and other health care providers to prevent development of unhealthy weight control behaviors. Findings from the current study have the potential to guide both future research studies and clinical interventions on obesity in adolescents."

The study appears in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

SOURCES: American Dietetic Association, news release, Dec. 2, 2009 Published on: December 04, 2009