ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Laugh and the World Understands
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Add your Article

Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies

(HealthDay News) -- Increased exercise, reduced soda consumption and self-weighing are among the most effective weight control strategies for adolescents, a new study shows.

Researchers surveyed 130 adolescents about their weight-control strategies and lifestyle habits. Sixty-two had succeeded in losing weight and 68 had not. The responses were grouped into four categories:

* Healthy weight control behaviors, which included eating fewer calories, increasing exercise, eating less high fat and junk food, drinking less soda, drinking more water, weighing oneself, eating more fruits and vegetables and doing different types of exercise.
* Unhealthy weight control behaviors, which included laxatives, vomiting, diuretics, smoking and fasting.
* Extreme dietary changes, which included use of liquid diet supplements, the Atkins diet, a structured diet, fasting and increasing protein consumption.
* Structured behaviors, which included eating a certain amount of calories, counting calories, recording food intake and working with a professional.

Overall, a higher percentage of participants who lost weight used six or more of the healthy weight control behaviors, compared to those who didn't lose weight. A minority of adolescents who lost weight reported using any of the structured weight control behaviors or extreme dietary changes.

"First of all, our findings provide a glimpse of optimism that adolescents can lose a significant amount of weight and maintain this weight loss," wrote Kerri Boutelle, of the departments of pediatrics and psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, and colleagues.

"Second, our findings suggest that there are no magical solutions, and that behaviors such as eating more fruits and vegetables and eating less fat and decreasing sedentary time seem to offer the most promise for success... Self-weighing may be a helpful monitoring tool for overweight adolescents; in the current study, the largest percentage of adolescents who lost weight reported weighing themselves on a weekly basis, while the largest percentage of adolescents who did not lose weight reported weighing themselves less than monthly. Lastly, unhealthy weight control behaviors were not associated with being in the group that lost weight. Adolescents would benefit from hearing this information from dietitians and other health care providers to prevent development of unhealthy weight control behaviors. Findings from the current study have the potential to guide both future research studies and clinical interventions on obesity in adolescents."

The study appears in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

SOURCES: American Dietetic Association, news release, Dec. 2, 2009 Published on: December 04, 2009