ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies

(HealthDay News) -- Increased exercise, reduced soda consumption and self-weighing are among the most effective weight control strategies for adolescents, a new study shows.

Researchers surveyed 130 adolescents about their weight-control strategies and lifestyle habits. Sixty-two had succeeded in losing weight and 68 had not. The responses were grouped into four categories:

* Healthy weight control behaviors, which included eating fewer calories, increasing exercise, eating less high fat and junk food, drinking less soda, drinking more water, weighing oneself, eating more fruits and vegetables and doing different types of exercise.
* Unhealthy weight control behaviors, which included laxatives, vomiting, diuretics, smoking and fasting.
* Extreme dietary changes, which included use of liquid diet supplements, the Atkins diet, a structured diet, fasting and increasing protein consumption.
* Structured behaviors, which included eating a certain amount of calories, counting calories, recording food intake and working with a professional.

Overall, a higher percentage of participants who lost weight used six or more of the healthy weight control behaviors, compared to those who didn't lose weight. A minority of adolescents who lost weight reported using any of the structured weight control behaviors or extreme dietary changes.

"First of all, our findings provide a glimpse of optimism that adolescents can lose a significant amount of weight and maintain this weight loss," wrote Kerri Boutelle, of the departments of pediatrics and psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, and colleagues.

"Second, our findings suggest that there are no magical solutions, and that behaviors such as eating more fruits and vegetables and eating less fat and decreasing sedentary time seem to offer the most promise for success... Self-weighing may be a helpful monitoring tool for overweight adolescents; in the current study, the largest percentage of adolescents who lost weight reported weighing themselves on a weekly basis, while the largest percentage of adolescents who did not lose weight reported weighing themselves less than monthly. Lastly, unhealthy weight control behaviors were not associated with being in the group that lost weight. Adolescents would benefit from hearing this information from dietitians and other health care providers to prevent development of unhealthy weight control behaviors. Findings from the current study have the potential to guide both future research studies and clinical interventions on obesity in adolescents."

The study appears in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

SOURCES: American Dietetic Association, news release, Dec. 2, 2009 Published on: December 04, 2009