ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Eating your way to Good Health
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
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Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection

With summer fast approaching, it's time to remind teens about the importance of sun protection, dermatologists say.

"Even one blistering sunburn can increase your risk of skin cancer. As few as five sunburns can double your risk of skin cancer," Dr. Anjali Dahiya, a dermatologist at the Iris Cantor Women's Health Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, said in a news release.

Teenage girls need to be especially vigilant about sun protection. The potentially fatal skin cancer melanoma is the most common cancer in young women aged 25 to 29. Much of the sun-related skin damage in these young women occurred in their teens.

"Sun exposure plays a significant role in the development of melanoma. Although more adults are using sunscreens during outdoor activities, many are unaware of how important it is to make sure that their children are getting the necessary skin protection," Dr. Desiree Ratner, director of dermatologic surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, said in the news release.

The doctors offered the following skin protection tips for teens and "tweens":

* Apply sunscreen to the entire surface of your body about 30 minutes before going outside. If you're swimming, reapply sunscreen once you're out of the water. Use a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and be sure it has both UVA and UVB blocking ingredients.
* Limit your sun exposure. In addition to using sunscreen, use hats, sunglasses and umbrellas.
* Never use tanning beds -- try self-tanning creams for a safer summer glow.
* Watch for freckles, which may be a sign of sustained sun damage.

SOURCES: New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, news release, April 12, 2010