ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection

With summer fast approaching, it's time to remind teens about the importance of sun protection, dermatologists say.

"Even one blistering sunburn can increase your risk of skin cancer. As few as five sunburns can double your risk of skin cancer," Dr. Anjali Dahiya, a dermatologist at the Iris Cantor Women's Health Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, said in a news release.

Teenage girls need to be especially vigilant about sun protection. The potentially fatal skin cancer melanoma is the most common cancer in young women aged 25 to 29. Much of the sun-related skin damage in these young women occurred in their teens.

"Sun exposure plays a significant role in the development of melanoma. Although more adults are using sunscreens during outdoor activities, many are unaware of how important it is to make sure that their children are getting the necessary skin protection," Dr. Desiree Ratner, director of dermatologic surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, said in the news release.

The doctors offered the following skin protection tips for teens and "tweens":

* Apply sunscreen to the entire surface of your body about 30 minutes before going outside. If you're swimming, reapply sunscreen once you're out of the water. Use a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and be sure it has both UVA and UVB blocking ingredients.
* Limit your sun exposure. In addition to using sunscreen, use hats, sunglasses and umbrellas.
* Never use tanning beds -- try self-tanning creams for a safer summer glow.
* Watch for freckles, which may be a sign of sustained sun damage.

SOURCES: New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, news release, April 12, 2010