ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
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Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection

With summer fast approaching, it's time to remind teens about the importance of sun protection, dermatologists say.

"Even one blistering sunburn can increase your risk of skin cancer. As few as five sunburns can double your risk of skin cancer," Dr. Anjali Dahiya, a dermatologist at the Iris Cantor Women's Health Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, said in a news release.

Teenage girls need to be especially vigilant about sun protection. The potentially fatal skin cancer melanoma is the most common cancer in young women aged 25 to 29. Much of the sun-related skin damage in these young women occurred in their teens.

"Sun exposure plays a significant role in the development of melanoma. Although more adults are using sunscreens during outdoor activities, many are unaware of how important it is to make sure that their children are getting the necessary skin protection," Dr. Desiree Ratner, director of dermatologic surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, said in the news release.

The doctors offered the following skin protection tips for teens and "tweens":

* Apply sunscreen to the entire surface of your body about 30 minutes before going outside. If you're swimming, reapply sunscreen once you're out of the water. Use a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and be sure it has both UVA and UVB blocking ingredients.
* Limit your sun exposure. In addition to using sunscreen, use hats, sunglasses and umbrellas.
* Never use tanning beds -- try self-tanning creams for a safer summer glow.
* Watch for freckles, which may be a sign of sustained sun damage.

SOURCES: New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, news release, April 12, 2010