ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On

UESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Internet- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are a cost-effective alternative to more expensive telephone hotlines or counseling services for smokers who are trying to quit, according to a new study.

"With the rising cost of health care, there is a need to look for less expensive health programs that are effective," study co-author Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, said in a university news release. "What we found in our meta-analysis was that Web- and computer-based programs, once they're up and running, are a worthy alternative."

The researchers analyzed the findings of 22 trials, involving almost 30,000 participants, that compared smokers who used Web- or computer-based smoking cessation programs with those who tried to quit on their own.

The percentage of smokers who remained tobacco-free a year after using the Web- or computer-based programs was 9.9 percent, about 1.7 times higher than the rate for those who tried to quit on their own.

The findings are in the May 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Currently, Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are not commonly recommended, because evidence of their effectiveness has been inconsistent," the lead author, Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung, a staff physician in the Smoking Cessation Clinic at the National Cancer Center in South Korea, said in the news release. "But our review of the evidence to date suggests that Web- and computer-based programs have a legitimate place in tobacco dependence treatment options."

Such programs can be particularly helpful for people with no health insurance and those concerned about the stigma of seeking treatment, Myung suggested.

Moskowitz said that many smokers prefer the flexibility and privacy offered by Web- and computer-based programs, which can be translated into various languages to help a wide range of people.