ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On

UESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Internet- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are a cost-effective alternative to more expensive telephone hotlines or counseling services for smokers who are trying to quit, according to a new study.

"With the rising cost of health care, there is a need to look for less expensive health programs that are effective," study co-author Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, said in a university news release. "What we found in our meta-analysis was that Web- and computer-based programs, once they're up and running, are a worthy alternative."

The researchers analyzed the findings of 22 trials, involving almost 30,000 participants, that compared smokers who used Web- or computer-based smoking cessation programs with those who tried to quit on their own.

The percentage of smokers who remained tobacco-free a year after using the Web- or computer-based programs was 9.9 percent, about 1.7 times higher than the rate for those who tried to quit on their own.

The findings are in the May 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Currently, Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are not commonly recommended, because evidence of their effectiveness has been inconsistent," the lead author, Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung, a staff physician in the Smoking Cessation Clinic at the National Cancer Center in South Korea, said in the news release. "But our review of the evidence to date suggests that Web- and computer-based programs have a legitimate place in tobacco dependence treatment options."

Such programs can be particularly helpful for people with no health insurance and those concerned about the stigma of seeking treatment, Myung suggested.

Moskowitz said that many smokers prefer the flexibility and privacy offered by Web- and computer-based programs, which can be translated into various languages to help a wide range of people.