ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
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To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On

UESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Internet- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are a cost-effective alternative to more expensive telephone hotlines or counseling services for smokers who are trying to quit, according to a new study.

"With the rising cost of health care, there is a need to look for less expensive health programs that are effective," study co-author Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, said in a university news release. "What we found in our meta-analysis was that Web- and computer-based programs, once they're up and running, are a worthy alternative."

The researchers analyzed the findings of 22 trials, involving almost 30,000 participants, that compared smokers who used Web- or computer-based smoking cessation programs with those who tried to quit on their own.

The percentage of smokers who remained tobacco-free a year after using the Web- or computer-based programs was 9.9 percent, about 1.7 times higher than the rate for those who tried to quit on their own.

The findings are in the May 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Currently, Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are not commonly recommended, because evidence of their effectiveness has been inconsistent," the lead author, Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung, a staff physician in the Smoking Cessation Clinic at the National Cancer Center in South Korea, said in the news release. "But our review of the evidence to date suggests that Web- and computer-based programs have a legitimate place in tobacco dependence treatment options."

Such programs can be particularly helpful for people with no health insurance and those concerned about the stigma of seeking treatment, Myung suggested.

Moskowitz said that many smokers prefer the flexibility and privacy offered by Web- and computer-based programs, which can be translated into various languages to help a wide range of people.