ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
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To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On

UESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Internet- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are a cost-effective alternative to more expensive telephone hotlines or counseling services for smokers who are trying to quit, according to a new study.

"With the rising cost of health care, there is a need to look for less expensive health programs that are effective," study co-author Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, said in a university news release. "What we found in our meta-analysis was that Web- and computer-based programs, once they're up and running, are a worthy alternative."

The researchers analyzed the findings of 22 trials, involving almost 30,000 participants, that compared smokers who used Web- or computer-based smoking cessation programs with those who tried to quit on their own.

The percentage of smokers who remained tobacco-free a year after using the Web- or computer-based programs was 9.9 percent, about 1.7 times higher than the rate for those who tried to quit on their own.

The findings are in the May 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Currently, Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are not commonly recommended, because evidence of their effectiveness has been inconsistent," the lead author, Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung, a staff physician in the Smoking Cessation Clinic at the National Cancer Center in South Korea, said in the news release. "But our review of the evidence to date suggests that Web- and computer-based programs have a legitimate place in tobacco dependence treatment options."

Such programs can be particularly helpful for people with no health insurance and those concerned about the stigma of seeking treatment, Myung suggested.

Moskowitz said that many smokers prefer the flexibility and privacy offered by Web- and computer-based programs, which can be translated into various languages to help a wide range of people.