ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Add your Article

Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says

FRIDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Few people who are at risk of an abdominal aortic aneurysm are getting preventive screenings, a new study has found.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a weak area in the main blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body. As blood passes through, the weakened area can bulge. Most abdominal aortic aneurysms initially have no symptoms but can be deadly if they rupture.

Symptoms of a rupture include sudden and increasing back and abdominal pain.

An estimated 1.5 million to 2 million Americans have this condition, but most are unaware of its potential threat to their lives, the researchers noted.

In the study, the researchers found that only two of 43 people -- or 4.6 percent -- identified as being at risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm had received the proper screening. The findings were to be presented Friday at the American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

Guidelines, based on available evidence and cost effectiveness, recommend one-time screening of men 65 to 70 years old who have ever smoked. Screening is done by a physical examination of the abdomen and ultrasound.

The researchers reviewed medical charts of 43 randomly selected men who were older than 65 and had used tobacco products. Other data collected included family history of heart disease. The participants' average age was 67. About 28 percent were white, 47 percent were black and 14 percent were Hispanic.

"Our analysis clearly shows that, despite current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations, at-risk patients are not receiving appropriate screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms," the researchers said.

Reasons for the lack of screening are unclear, they said. Possibilities might include doctors' being unaware of screening benefits, difficulty in ordering ultrasound, or people not following through on doctors' requests that they be screened.

By comparison, 51 percent of the participants had had a colonoscopy for cancer screening, and 65 percent had received a pneumonia vaccine or other preventive screenings.

More information

The Society of Interventional Radiology has more on abdominal aortic aneurysm.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 24, 2009

Last Updated: April 24, 2009

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