ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
CAREGIVING
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says

FRIDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Few people who are at risk of an abdominal aortic aneurysm are getting preventive screenings, a new study has found.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a weak area in the main blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body. As blood passes through, the weakened area can bulge. Most abdominal aortic aneurysms initially have no symptoms but can be deadly if they rupture.

Symptoms of a rupture include sudden and increasing back and abdominal pain.

An estimated 1.5 million to 2 million Americans have this condition, but most are unaware of its potential threat to their lives, the researchers noted.

In the study, the researchers found that only two of 43 people -- or 4.6 percent -- identified as being at risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm had received the proper screening. The findings were to be presented Friday at the American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

Guidelines, based on available evidence and cost effectiveness, recommend one-time screening of men 65 to 70 years old who have ever smoked. Screening is done by a physical examination of the abdomen and ultrasound.

The researchers reviewed medical charts of 43 randomly selected men who were older than 65 and had used tobacco products. Other data collected included family history of heart disease. The participants' average age was 67. About 28 percent were white, 47 percent were black and 14 percent were Hispanic.

"Our analysis clearly shows that, despite current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations, at-risk patients are not receiving appropriate screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms," the researchers said.

Reasons for the lack of screening are unclear, they said. Possibilities might include doctors' being unaware of screening benefits, difficulty in ordering ultrasound, or people not following through on doctors' requests that they be screened.

By comparison, 51 percent of the participants had had a colonoscopy for cancer screening, and 65 percent had received a pneumonia vaccine or other preventive screenings.

More information

The Society of Interventional Radiology has more on abdominal aortic aneurysm.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 24, 2009

Last Updated: April 24, 2009

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