ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
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Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes

Here's another reason to brush your teeth regularly: People who don't perform this essential of oral hygiene seem to have a greater risk of heart disease compared to their more diligent peers.

"We were surprised to find a relationship between toothbrushing frequency and both cardiovascular disease and inflammatory markers in the blood," said Richard Watt, co-author of a study published this week in the BMJ.

"We have not established a causal relationship, however. More research is needed to test if improving patients' oral hygiene to reduce their gum inflammation has an effect on cardiovascular disease risk," added Watt, who is with the department of epidemiology and public health at University College London.

The findings do make sense, however, in light of previous studies that have found a relationship between gum disease and heart disease. Periodontal disease has been associated with a 19 percent increase in the risk of heart disease. That number leaps to 44 percent in people under the age of 65, according to the study.

The most likely culprit is the inflammation associated with gum disease, which can go system-wide and contribute to plaque build-up in the arteries.

The study authors surveyed almost 12,000 people living in Scotland who admitted to how often they brushed their teeth.

Over an average eight years of follow-up, people who "rarely or never brushed" their teeth had a 70 percent increased risk of a heart attack, stroke or other event, compared to those who set to the task twice a day.

The rarely/never brushers also had higher levels of C reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

Overall, though, participants practiced good oral hygiene with almost two-thirds saying they went to the dentist every six months and almost three-quarters reporting brushing their teeth twice daily.

"We talk often about lifestyle behaviors such as smoking, exercise and diet, and one of the things we can't forget about when it comes to self-maintenance is oral hygiene," said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a preventive cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. "It's one new thing. Don't smoke, eat right and brush your teeth."

"It's nice to have one more reason to brush your teeth," added Dr. Harmony R. Reynolds, associate director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center at NYU Langone Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. "Over time, it reduces inflammation."

SOURCES: Richard Watt, Ph.D., department of epidemiology and public health, University College London; Suzanne Steinbaum, D.O., preventive cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City, and spokeswoman, American Heart Association; Harmony R. Reynolds, M.D., associate director, Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and assistant professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; May 28, 2010, BMJ Published on: May 28, 2010