ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
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Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes

Here's another reason to brush your teeth regularly: People who don't perform this essential of oral hygiene seem to have a greater risk of heart disease compared to their more diligent peers.

"We were surprised to find a relationship between toothbrushing frequency and both cardiovascular disease and inflammatory markers in the blood," said Richard Watt, co-author of a study published this week in the BMJ.

"We have not established a causal relationship, however. More research is needed to test if improving patients' oral hygiene to reduce their gum inflammation has an effect on cardiovascular disease risk," added Watt, who is with the department of epidemiology and public health at University College London.

The findings do make sense, however, in light of previous studies that have found a relationship between gum disease and heart disease. Periodontal disease has been associated with a 19 percent increase in the risk of heart disease. That number leaps to 44 percent in people under the age of 65, according to the study.

The most likely culprit is the inflammation associated with gum disease, which can go system-wide and contribute to plaque build-up in the arteries.

The study authors surveyed almost 12,000 people living in Scotland who admitted to how often they brushed their teeth.

Over an average eight years of follow-up, people who "rarely or never brushed" their teeth had a 70 percent increased risk of a heart attack, stroke or other event, compared to those who set to the task twice a day.

The rarely/never brushers also had higher levels of C reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

Overall, though, participants practiced good oral hygiene with almost two-thirds saying they went to the dentist every six months and almost three-quarters reporting brushing their teeth twice daily.

"We talk often about lifestyle behaviors such as smoking, exercise and diet, and one of the things we can't forget about when it comes to self-maintenance is oral hygiene," said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a preventive cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. "It's one new thing. Don't smoke, eat right and brush your teeth."

"It's nice to have one more reason to brush your teeth," added Dr. Harmony R. Reynolds, associate director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center at NYU Langone Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. "Over time, it reduces inflammation."

SOURCES: Richard Watt, Ph.D., department of epidemiology and public health, University College London; Suzanne Steinbaum, D.O., preventive cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City, and spokeswoman, American Heart Association; Harmony R. Reynolds, M.D., associate director, Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and assistant professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; May 28, 2010, BMJ Published on: May 28, 2010