ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
The Raw Food Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Smog Tougher on the Obese
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes

Here's another reason to brush your teeth regularly: People who don't perform this essential of oral hygiene seem to have a greater risk of heart disease compared to their more diligent peers.

"We were surprised to find a relationship between toothbrushing frequency and both cardiovascular disease and inflammatory markers in the blood," said Richard Watt, co-author of a study published this week in the BMJ.

"We have not established a causal relationship, however. More research is needed to test if improving patients' oral hygiene to reduce their gum inflammation has an effect on cardiovascular disease risk," added Watt, who is with the department of epidemiology and public health at University College London.

The findings do make sense, however, in light of previous studies that have found a relationship between gum disease and heart disease. Periodontal disease has been associated with a 19 percent increase in the risk of heart disease. That number leaps to 44 percent in people under the age of 65, according to the study.

The most likely culprit is the inflammation associated with gum disease, which can go system-wide and contribute to plaque build-up in the arteries.

The study authors surveyed almost 12,000 people living in Scotland who admitted to how often they brushed their teeth.

Over an average eight years of follow-up, people who "rarely or never brushed" their teeth had a 70 percent increased risk of a heart attack, stroke or other event, compared to those who set to the task twice a day.

The rarely/never brushers also had higher levels of C reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

Overall, though, participants practiced good oral hygiene with almost two-thirds saying they went to the dentist every six months and almost three-quarters reporting brushing their teeth twice daily.

"We talk often about lifestyle behaviors such as smoking, exercise and diet, and one of the things we can't forget about when it comes to self-maintenance is oral hygiene," said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a preventive cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. "It's one new thing. Don't smoke, eat right and brush your teeth."

"It's nice to have one more reason to brush your teeth," added Dr. Harmony R. Reynolds, associate director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center at NYU Langone Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. "Over time, it reduces inflammation."

SOURCES: Richard Watt, Ph.D., department of epidemiology and public health, University College London; Suzanne Steinbaum, D.O., preventive cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City, and spokeswoman, American Heart Association; Harmony R. Reynolds, M.D., associate director, Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and assistant professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; May 28, 2010, BMJ Published on: May 28, 2010