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Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
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Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
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Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
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Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
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Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
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Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
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INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
The Unmedicated Mind
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
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Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
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Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways

Showers and baths are potential sources of hormones, antibiotics and other medicines that pollute water, a new study shows.

Toilets are a known source of environmental pollution from active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which are excreted in urine and feces. In addition, many people flush unused drugs down the toilet. APIs can make it through the disinfection process at sewage treatment plants and enter rivers, lakes and oceans. Some APIs end up in drinking water.

This study is the first to link bathing, showering and laundering with API water pollution.

"These routes may be important for certain APIs found in medications that are applied topically, which means to the skin. They include creams, lotions, ointments, gels and skin patches," study co-author Dr. Ilene Ruhoy, director of the Institute for Environmental Medicine at Touro University in Henderson, Nev., said in a news release.

Because they are intact when they enter the environment, topical APIs can have a greater impact than APIs released in feces and urine, which have been broken down by the liver and kidneys.

For this study, the researchers reviewed hundreds of studies on the metabolism and use of medications. The findings were to be presented Thursday at the American Chemical Society annual meeting in San Francisco.

"We need to be more aware of how our use of pharmaceuticals can have unwanted environmental effects," Ruhoy said. "Identifying the major pathways in which APIs enter the environment is an important step toward the goal of minimizing their environmental impact."

SOURCES: American Chemical Society, news release, March 24, 2010 Published on: March 25, 2010