ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
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Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
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BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
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Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
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Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
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Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
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DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Functional Foods Uncovered
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
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Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
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HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
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Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
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HEARING
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Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
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Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
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KID'S HEALTH
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Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
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MENTAL HEALTH
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Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
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PAIN
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Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
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PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
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Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
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Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
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Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids

(HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to outdoor traffic pollution and indoor endotoxin are at increased risk for asthma, researchers say.

Endotoxin -- a component of bacteria believed to trigger an immune response in humans -- is found in dust.

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers found persistent wheezing (an early warning sign of asthma and other lung conditions) in 36 percent of 3-year-olds who were exposed to high levels of traffic pollution and indoor endotoxin as infants.

In comparison, wheezing was seen in 11 percent of children exposed to low levels of outdoor and indoor allergens as infants, and in 18 percent of children exposed to high levels of traffic pollution and low levels of indoor endotoxin. Endotoxin exposure alone appeared to have little effect on children, the study authors noted.

"There is a clear synergistic effect from co-exposure to traffic-related particles and endotoxin above and beyond what you would see with a single exposure that can be connected to persistent wheezing by age 3," study author Patrick Ryan, a research assistant professor of environmental health, said in a university news release. "These two exposure sources -- when simultaneously present at high levels -- appear to work together to negatively impact the health of young children with developing lungs."

"Traffic-related particles and endotoxin both seem to trigger an inflammatory response in the children monitored in this study. When put together, that effect is amplified to have a greater impact on the body's response," Ryan explained. "The earlier in life this type of exposure occurs, the more impact it may have long term. Lung development occurs in children up through age 18 or 20. Exposure earlier in life to both endotoxin and traffic will have a greater impact on developing lungs compared to adults whose lungs are already developed."

The findings are published in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

SOURCES: University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, news release, Nov. 24, 2009 Published on: November 24, 2009