ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Sleep and Do Better
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
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Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids

(HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to outdoor traffic pollution and indoor endotoxin are at increased risk for asthma, researchers say.

Endotoxin -- a component of bacteria believed to trigger an immune response in humans -- is found in dust.

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers found persistent wheezing (an early warning sign of asthma and other lung conditions) in 36 percent of 3-year-olds who were exposed to high levels of traffic pollution and indoor endotoxin as infants.

In comparison, wheezing was seen in 11 percent of children exposed to low levels of outdoor and indoor allergens as infants, and in 18 percent of children exposed to high levels of traffic pollution and low levels of indoor endotoxin. Endotoxin exposure alone appeared to have little effect on children, the study authors noted.

"There is a clear synergistic effect from co-exposure to traffic-related particles and endotoxin above and beyond what you would see with a single exposure that can be connected to persistent wheezing by age 3," study author Patrick Ryan, a research assistant professor of environmental health, said in a university news release. "These two exposure sources -- when simultaneously present at high levels -- appear to work together to negatively impact the health of young children with developing lungs."

"Traffic-related particles and endotoxin both seem to trigger an inflammatory response in the children monitored in this study. When put together, that effect is amplified to have a greater impact on the body's response," Ryan explained. "The earlier in life this type of exposure occurs, the more impact it may have long term. Lung development occurs in children up through age 18 or 20. Exposure earlier in life to both endotoxin and traffic will have a greater impact on developing lungs compared to adults whose lungs are already developed."

The findings are published in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

SOURCES: University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, news release, Nov. 24, 2009 Published on: November 24, 2009