ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
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Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse

Air pollution from city traffic appears to increase asthma attacks in kids that require an emergency room visit, a new study reports.

The effect was found to be strongest during the warmer parts of the year.

The researchers who conducted the study, done in Atlanta, were trying to pinpoint which components of pollution play the biggest role in making asthma worse.

"Characterizing the associations between ambient air pollutants and pediatric asthma exacerbations, particularly with respect to the chemical composition of particulate matter, can help us better understand the impact of these different components and can help to inform public health policy decisions," the study's lead author, Matthew J. Strickland, an assistant professor of environmental health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society.

The researchers examined the medical records of children 5 to 17 years old who had been treated in Atlanta-area emergency rooms from 1993 to 2004 because of asthma attacks. Data were gathered from more than 90,000 asthma-related visits.

They then analyzed connections between the visits and daily data on the levels of 11 different pollutants.

The researchers found signs that ozone worsens asthma, as they had expected. But they also found indications that components of pollution that comes from combustion engines, such as those in cars and trucks, were also linked to serious asthma problems in kids.

Results of the study were published online April 22 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

SOURCES: American Thoracic Society, news release, April 22, 2010 Published on: April 22, 2010