ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse

Air pollution from city traffic appears to increase asthma attacks in kids that require an emergency room visit, a new study reports.

The effect was found to be strongest during the warmer parts of the year.

The researchers who conducted the study, done in Atlanta, were trying to pinpoint which components of pollution play the biggest role in making asthma worse.

"Characterizing the associations between ambient air pollutants and pediatric asthma exacerbations, particularly with respect to the chemical composition of particulate matter, can help us better understand the impact of these different components and can help to inform public health policy decisions," the study's lead author, Matthew J. Strickland, an assistant professor of environmental health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society.

The researchers examined the medical records of children 5 to 17 years old who had been treated in Atlanta-area emergency rooms from 1993 to 2004 because of asthma attacks. Data were gathered from more than 90,000 asthma-related visits.

They then analyzed connections between the visits and daily data on the levels of 11 different pollutants.

The researchers found signs that ozone worsens asthma, as they had expected. But they also found indications that components of pollution that comes from combustion engines, such as those in cars and trucks, were also linked to serious asthma problems in kids.

Results of the study were published online April 22 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

SOURCES: American Thoracic Society, news release, April 22, 2010 Published on: April 22, 2010