ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
CAREGIVING
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Add your Article

Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A stepped-up care approach is outlined in updated treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes released Wednesday by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lifestyle changes and the drug metformin remain the recommended initial treatment to help people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes control levels of blood glucose and A1C, a measure of average glucose levels during the previous two to three months, according to the panel of experts who wrote the updated guidelines.

If this fails to help patients achieve target glucose/A1C levels, there are two treatment choices. One -- which is preferred and well-validated -- involves the addition of basal insulin or a sulfonylurea to lifestyle changes and metformin. The second choice involves the addition of the drug pioglitazone or a GLP-1 agonist to lifestyle changes and metformin.

If neither of the step 2 choices work, the experts suggested the use of basal insulin, if not already started, and then transition to intensive insulin, if needed.

As in the original guidelines, all of the transitions in therapy usually occur at three-month intervals, with the objective of achieving rapid and continuous maintenance of near-normal glucose and A1C levels.

The updated guidelines were published online in the journals Diabetes Care and Diabetologia.

"Excellent glycemic control is critical to prevent the long-term complications associated with diabetes, which can lead to loss of vision, kidney failure, and amputation," Dr. David M. Nathan, panel chairman, said in an American Diabetes Association news release.

"After much deliberation, we intentionally chose therapies we highly recommend as safe, effective, and that have much evidence supporting their use. The second tier drugs are valuable if hypoglycemia [low blood sugar] is a major concern, but the use of these drugs is less validated," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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