ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A stepped-up care approach is outlined in updated treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes released Wednesday by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lifestyle changes and the drug metformin remain the recommended initial treatment to help people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes control levels of blood glucose and A1C, a measure of average glucose levels during the previous two to three months, according to the panel of experts who wrote the updated guidelines.

If this fails to help patients achieve target glucose/A1C levels, there are two treatment choices. One -- which is preferred and well-validated -- involves the addition of basal insulin or a sulfonylurea to lifestyle changes and metformin. The second choice involves the addition of the drug pioglitazone or a GLP-1 agonist to lifestyle changes and metformin.

If neither of the step 2 choices work, the experts suggested the use of basal insulin, if not already started, and then transition to intensive insulin, if needed.

As in the original guidelines, all of the transitions in therapy usually occur at three-month intervals, with the objective of achieving rapid and continuous maintenance of near-normal glucose and A1C levels.

The updated guidelines were published online in the journals Diabetes Care and Diabetologia.

"Excellent glycemic control is critical to prevent the long-term complications associated with diabetes, which can lead to loss of vision, kidney failure, and amputation," Dr. David M. Nathan, panel chairman, said in an American Diabetes Association news release.

"After much deliberation, we intentionally chose therapies we highly recommend as safe, effective, and that have much evidence supporting their use. The second tier drugs are valuable if hypoglycemia [low blood sugar] is a major concern, but the use of these drugs is less validated," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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