ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A stepped-up care approach is outlined in updated treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes released Wednesday by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lifestyle changes and the drug metformin remain the recommended initial treatment to help people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes control levels of blood glucose and A1C, a measure of average glucose levels during the previous two to three months, according to the panel of experts who wrote the updated guidelines.

If this fails to help patients achieve target glucose/A1C levels, there are two treatment choices. One -- which is preferred and well-validated -- involves the addition of basal insulin or a sulfonylurea to lifestyle changes and metformin. The second choice involves the addition of the drug pioglitazone or a GLP-1 agonist to lifestyle changes and metformin.

If neither of the step 2 choices work, the experts suggested the use of basal insulin, if not already started, and then transition to intensive insulin, if needed.

As in the original guidelines, all of the transitions in therapy usually occur at three-month intervals, with the objective of achieving rapid and continuous maintenance of near-normal glucose and A1C levels.

The updated guidelines were published online in the journals Diabetes Care and Diabetologia.

"Excellent glycemic control is critical to prevent the long-term complications associated with diabetes, which can lead to loss of vision, kidney failure, and amputation," Dr. David M. Nathan, panel chairman, said in an American Diabetes Association news release.

"After much deliberation, we intentionally chose therapies we highly recommend as safe, effective, and that have much evidence supporting their use. The second tier drugs are valuable if hypoglycemia [low blood sugar] is a major concern, but the use of these drugs is less validated," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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