ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Sleep and Do Better
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Add your Article

Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A stepped-up care approach is outlined in updated treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes released Wednesday by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lifestyle changes and the drug metformin remain the recommended initial treatment to help people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes control levels of blood glucose and A1C, a measure of average glucose levels during the previous two to three months, according to the panel of experts who wrote the updated guidelines.

If this fails to help patients achieve target glucose/A1C levels, there are two treatment choices. One -- which is preferred and well-validated -- involves the addition of basal insulin or a sulfonylurea to lifestyle changes and metformin. The second choice involves the addition of the drug pioglitazone or a GLP-1 agonist to lifestyle changes and metformin.

If neither of the step 2 choices work, the experts suggested the use of basal insulin, if not already started, and then transition to intensive insulin, if needed.

As in the original guidelines, all of the transitions in therapy usually occur at three-month intervals, with the objective of achieving rapid and continuous maintenance of near-normal glucose and A1C levels.

The updated guidelines were published online in the journals Diabetes Care and Diabetologia.

"Excellent glycemic control is critical to prevent the long-term complications associated with diabetes, which can lead to loss of vision, kidney failure, and amputation," Dr. David M. Nathan, panel chairman, said in an American Diabetes Association news release.

"After much deliberation, we intentionally chose therapies we highly recommend as safe, effective, and that have much evidence supporting their use. The second tier drugs are valuable if hypoglycemia [low blood sugar] is a major concern, but the use of these drugs is less validated," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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