ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Free Range
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Countdown to Hair Loss
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Add your Article

Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A stepped-up care approach is outlined in updated treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes released Wednesday by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lifestyle changes and the drug metformin remain the recommended initial treatment to help people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes control levels of blood glucose and A1C, a measure of average glucose levels during the previous two to three months, according to the panel of experts who wrote the updated guidelines.

If this fails to help patients achieve target glucose/A1C levels, there are two treatment choices. One -- which is preferred and well-validated -- involves the addition of basal insulin or a sulfonylurea to lifestyle changes and metformin. The second choice involves the addition of the drug pioglitazone or a GLP-1 agonist to lifestyle changes and metformin.

If neither of the step 2 choices work, the experts suggested the use of basal insulin, if not already started, and then transition to intensive insulin, if needed.

As in the original guidelines, all of the transitions in therapy usually occur at three-month intervals, with the objective of achieving rapid and continuous maintenance of near-normal glucose and A1C levels.

The updated guidelines were published online in the journals Diabetes Care and Diabetologia.

"Excellent glycemic control is critical to prevent the long-term complications associated with diabetes, which can lead to loss of vision, kidney failure, and amputation," Dr. David M. Nathan, panel chairman, said in an American Diabetes Association news release.

"After much deliberation, we intentionally chose therapies we highly recommend as safe, effective, and that have much evidence supporting their use. The second tier drugs are valuable if hypoglycemia [low blood sugar] is a major concern, but the use of these drugs is less validated," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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