ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Laugh and the World Understands
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 25,000 cases of cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) occurred in 38 states and the District of Columbia between 1998 and 2003, U.S. officials reported Monday.

HPV is a group of viruses that includes more than 100 different types, more than 30 of which can be sexually transmitted. Most people with HPV infections don't develop symptoms or health problems, but some HPV types can cause cancer.

In its report, which covers the period before the HPV vaccine was available, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the most common sites for HPV-associated cancers were the cervix, head and neck, anus, vulva, penis and vagina.

HPV-associated cancers occur most often in the cervix -- about 10,800 per year. Black and Hispanic women had higher rates of cervical cancer than white and non-Hispanic women, the CDC said.

There were almost 7,400 HPV-associated head and neck cancers per year. These types of cancers increased 3 percent a year during the period examined in the study.

Among the other findings:

* There were more than 3,000 HPV-associated anal cancers per year; about 1,900 occurred in women and 1,100 in men. Whites had the highest rates among women, while blacks had the highest rates among men.
* There were 2,300 cases of HPV-associated vulvar cancer each year. White women had higher rates than black and Asian/Pacific Islander women.
* HPV-associated penile cancer was diagnosed in about 800 men a year. Hispanic men were more likely than non-Hispanic men to have this type of cancer.
* There were about 600 new HPV-associated vaginal cancers a year. Rates were higher among black women than white women, while Asian/ Pacific Islander women had the lowest rates.
* Women with a history of cervical cancer have an increased risk of developing subsequent non-invasive cancers of the vagina and vulva, as well as invasive cancers of the vagina, vulva and rectum.

The findings, which were published online, will be in the Nov. 15 supplement edition of the journal Cancer.

The report is the first analysis of the largest, most-comprehensive assessment of HPV-associated cancer data to date in the United States, the CDC said.

"These estimates of HPV-associated cancers were collected prior to the development of HPV vaccine. This gives us baseline data to measure the impact of HPV vaccine and cervical cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated cancers and precancers," Dr. Mona Saraiya, medical officer in the CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, said in a news release.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about HPV and HPV vaccines.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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