ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 25,000 cases of cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) occurred in 38 states and the District of Columbia between 1998 and 2003, U.S. officials reported Monday.

HPV is a group of viruses that includes more than 100 different types, more than 30 of which can be sexually transmitted. Most people with HPV infections don't develop symptoms or health problems, but some HPV types can cause cancer.

In its report, which covers the period before the HPV vaccine was available, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the most common sites for HPV-associated cancers were the cervix, head and neck, anus, vulva, penis and vagina.

HPV-associated cancers occur most often in the cervix -- about 10,800 per year. Black and Hispanic women had higher rates of cervical cancer than white and non-Hispanic women, the CDC said.

There were almost 7,400 HPV-associated head and neck cancers per year. These types of cancers increased 3 percent a year during the period examined in the study.

Among the other findings:

* There were more than 3,000 HPV-associated anal cancers per year; about 1,900 occurred in women and 1,100 in men. Whites had the highest rates among women, while blacks had the highest rates among men.
* There were 2,300 cases of HPV-associated vulvar cancer each year. White women had higher rates than black and Asian/Pacific Islander women.
* HPV-associated penile cancer was diagnosed in about 800 men a year. Hispanic men were more likely than non-Hispanic men to have this type of cancer.
* There were about 600 new HPV-associated vaginal cancers a year. Rates were higher among black women than white women, while Asian/ Pacific Islander women had the lowest rates.
* Women with a history of cervical cancer have an increased risk of developing subsequent non-invasive cancers of the vagina and vulva, as well as invasive cancers of the vagina, vulva and rectum.

The findings, which were published online, will be in the Nov. 15 supplement edition of the journal Cancer.

The report is the first analysis of the largest, most-comprehensive assessment of HPV-associated cancer data to date in the United States, the CDC said.

"These estimates of HPV-associated cancers were collected prior to the development of HPV vaccine. This gives us baseline data to measure the impact of HPV vaccine and cervical cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated cancers and precancers," Dr. Mona Saraiya, medical officer in the CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, said in a news release.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about HPV and HPV vaccines.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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