ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Hoping for a Happy Family Holiday? Here's How
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Add your Article

Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Vigorous activity can reduce the risk of breast cancer by about 30 percent in normal-weight women, according to an 11-year U.S. study of 32,269 postmenopausal women.

For the study, vigorous activity was defined as heavy housework (scrubbing floors, washing windows, demanding yard work, digging, chopping wood) and strenuous sports or exercise, such as running, fast jogging, competitive tennis, aerobics, bicycling on hills, and fast dancing.

While vigorous activity reduced breast cancer risk in normal-weight women, it had no effect in women who were overweight or obese, according to study leader Michael F. Leitzmann and colleagues.

They also found that non-vigorous activity, such as light housework (vacuuming, doing laundry, painting, general gardening) and light sports or exercise (walking, hiking, light jogging, recreational tennis, bowling) offered no protection against breast cancer.

The findings were published in the journal Breast Cancer Research.

"Possible mechanisms through which physical activity may protect against breast cancer that are independent of body mass include reduced exposure to growth factors, enhanced immune function, and decreased chronic inflammation, variables that are related both to greater physical activity and to lower breast cancer risk," the study authors wrote.

"An alternative explanation for the stronger apparent effect of vigorous activity among lean over heavy women is that heavier women may misreport non-vigorous activities as vigorous activities," the researchers added.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about breast cancer risk.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BioMed Central, news release, Oct. 30, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 31, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com