ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Add your Article

Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Vigorous activity can reduce the risk of breast cancer by about 30 percent in normal-weight women, according to an 11-year U.S. study of 32,269 postmenopausal women.

For the study, vigorous activity was defined as heavy housework (scrubbing floors, washing windows, demanding yard work, digging, chopping wood) and strenuous sports or exercise, such as running, fast jogging, competitive tennis, aerobics, bicycling on hills, and fast dancing.

While vigorous activity reduced breast cancer risk in normal-weight women, it had no effect in women who were overweight or obese, according to study leader Michael F. Leitzmann and colleagues.

They also found that non-vigorous activity, such as light housework (vacuuming, doing laundry, painting, general gardening) and light sports or exercise (walking, hiking, light jogging, recreational tennis, bowling) offered no protection against breast cancer.

The findings were published in the journal Breast Cancer Research.

"Possible mechanisms through which physical activity may protect against breast cancer that are independent of body mass include reduced exposure to growth factors, enhanced immune function, and decreased chronic inflammation, variables that are related both to greater physical activity and to lower breast cancer risk," the study authors wrote.

"An alternative explanation for the stronger apparent effect of vigorous activity among lean over heavy women is that heavier women may misreport non-vigorous activities as vigorous activities," the researchers added.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about breast cancer risk.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BioMed Central, news release, Oct. 30, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 31, 2008

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