ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Vigorous activity can reduce the risk of breast cancer by about 30 percent in normal-weight women, according to an 11-year U.S. study of 32,269 postmenopausal women.

For the study, vigorous activity was defined as heavy housework (scrubbing floors, washing windows, demanding yard work, digging, chopping wood) and strenuous sports or exercise, such as running, fast jogging, competitive tennis, aerobics, bicycling on hills, and fast dancing.

While vigorous activity reduced breast cancer risk in normal-weight women, it had no effect in women who were overweight or obese, according to study leader Michael F. Leitzmann and colleagues.

They also found that non-vigorous activity, such as light housework (vacuuming, doing laundry, painting, general gardening) and light sports or exercise (walking, hiking, light jogging, recreational tennis, bowling) offered no protection against breast cancer.

The findings were published in the journal Breast Cancer Research.

"Possible mechanisms through which physical activity may protect against breast cancer that are independent of body mass include reduced exposure to growth factors, enhanced immune function, and decreased chronic inflammation, variables that are related both to greater physical activity and to lower breast cancer risk," the study authors wrote.

"An alternative explanation for the stronger apparent effect of vigorous activity among lean over heavy women is that heavier women may misreport non-vigorous activities as vigorous activities," the researchers added.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about breast cancer risk.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BioMed Central, news release, Oct. 30, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 31, 2008

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