ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
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Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women

(HealthDay News) -- Moderate-to-high intensity exercise such as jogging, swimming or tennis may help reduce stroke risk in older men but not in women, researchers report.

The study included almost 3,300 men and women, average age 69, in Manhattan who were followed for about nine years. During that time, there were 238 strokes among the participants. At the start of the study, 20 percent of the participants said they did regular moderate-to-high intensity exercise, while 41 percent said they did no physical activity.

Men who did moderate-to-high intensity exercise were 63 percent less likely to have a stroke than people who didn't exercise. Over five years, the baseline risk of ischemic stroke (the leading type of stroke) for all study participants was 4.3 percent; 2.7 percent for those who did moderate-to-high intensity exercise and 4.6 percent for those who didn't exercise.

The study appears in the Nov. 24 issue of the journal Neurology.

"Taking part in moderate-to-heavy intensity physical activity may be an important factor for preventing stroke," study author Dr. Joshua Z. Willey, of Columbia University Medical Center and New York Presbyterian Hospital at Columbia, concluded in a news release.

"A large percentage of the participants were not taking part in any physical activities. This may be true of many elderly people who live in cities. Identifying ways to improve physical activity among these people may be a key goal for public health," Willey said.

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States and the third leading cause of death.

SOURCES: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Nov. 23, 2009 Published on: November 23, 2009