ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Eat Light - Live Longer
What you need to know about swine flu.
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones

FRIDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise is better than non-aerobic activities at suppressing appetite, according to a U.K. study.

The research involved 11 male university students who participated in three types of sessions. In one, they ran for 60 minutes on a treadmill and then rested for seven hours. In another, they did 90 minutes of weight lifting and then rested for 6.5 hours. In the third session, they did no exercise.

The participants received two meals during each session and also reported their hunger levels at various points during each session. The researchers measured the students' levels of two major appetite hormones: ghrelin (which stimulates appetite) and peptide YY (which suppresses appetite).

During the treadmill session (aerobic exercise), ghrelin levels dropped and peptide YY levels increased, indicating that the hormones were suppressing appetite. During the weightlifting (non-aerobic) session, ghrelin levels decreased, but there was no significant change in peptide YY levels. The appetite hormone effects of both types of exercise lasted for a few hours.

Both types of exercise suppressed hunger, but aerobic exercise resulted in greater suppression of hunger. The findings were published online in the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

"The finding that hunger is suppressed during and immediately after vigorous treadmill running is consistent with previous studies indicating that strenuous aerobic exercise transiently suppresses appetite," senior author David J. Stensel, of Loughborough University, said in an American Physiological Society news release. "The findings suggest a similar, although slightly attenuated response, for weight-lifting exercise."

He said this line of research may lead to more effective ways to use exercise to help control weight.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about physical activity and weight control.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Physiological Society, news release, Dec. 11, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 26, 2008

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