ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Free Range
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones

FRIDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise is better than non-aerobic activities at suppressing appetite, according to a U.K. study.

The research involved 11 male university students who participated in three types of sessions. In one, they ran for 60 minutes on a treadmill and then rested for seven hours. In another, they did 90 minutes of weight lifting and then rested for 6.5 hours. In the third session, they did no exercise.

The participants received two meals during each session and also reported their hunger levels at various points during each session. The researchers measured the students' levels of two major appetite hormones: ghrelin (which stimulates appetite) and peptide YY (which suppresses appetite).

During the treadmill session (aerobic exercise), ghrelin levels dropped and peptide YY levels increased, indicating that the hormones were suppressing appetite. During the weightlifting (non-aerobic) session, ghrelin levels decreased, but there was no significant change in peptide YY levels. The appetite hormone effects of both types of exercise lasted for a few hours.

Both types of exercise suppressed hunger, but aerobic exercise resulted in greater suppression of hunger. The findings were published online in the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

"The finding that hunger is suppressed during and immediately after vigorous treadmill running is consistent with previous studies indicating that strenuous aerobic exercise transiently suppresses appetite," senior author David J. Stensel, of Loughborough University, said in an American Physiological Society news release. "The findings suggest a similar, although slightly attenuated response, for weight-lifting exercise."

He said this line of research may lead to more effective ways to use exercise to help control weight.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about physical activity and weight control.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Physiological Society, news release, Dec. 11, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 26, 2008

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