ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Functional Foods Uncovered
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients

(HealthDay News) -- Many breast cancer patients have low levels of vitamin D, which could lead to weaker bones and increased risk of fractures, say U.S. researchers who recommend high doses of vitamin D for them.

"Vitamin D is essential to maintaining bone health, and women with breast cancer have accelerated bone loss due to the nature of hormone therapy and chemotherapy. It's important for women and their doctors to work together to boost their vitamin D intake," Luke Peppone, a research assistant professor of radiation oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a news release from the medical cwnter.

Peppone and colleagues studied 166 women undergoing treatment for breast cancer and found that nearly 70 percent had low levels of vitamin D in their blood. The average level among the women was 27 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood. Levels of 32 nanograms per milliliter are adequate, according to the U.S. Institute of Medicine.

The lowest levels of vitamin D were in non-whites and those with late-stage breast cancer.

The researchers found that weekly supplementation with high doses of vitamin D (50,000 IU or more) boosted the levels of the vitamin among all the women.

The study was to be presented Oct. 8 at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's breast cancer symposium in San Francisco.

Previous studies have shown that nearly half of all women and men have vitamin D levels below 32 nanograms per milliliter. Along with strengthening bones, vitamin D plays an important role in cell growth and keeping the immune system strong. People obtain Vitamin D through exposure to sunlight and from foods such as milk and fortified cereals.

SOURCES: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Oct. 8, 2009