ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients

(HealthDay News) -- Many breast cancer patients have low levels of vitamin D, which could lead to weaker bones and increased risk of fractures, say U.S. researchers who recommend high doses of vitamin D for them.

"Vitamin D is essential to maintaining bone health, and women with breast cancer have accelerated bone loss due to the nature of hormone therapy and chemotherapy. It's important for women and their doctors to work together to boost their vitamin D intake," Luke Peppone, a research assistant professor of radiation oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a news release from the medical cwnter.

Peppone and colleagues studied 166 women undergoing treatment for breast cancer and found that nearly 70 percent had low levels of vitamin D in their blood. The average level among the women was 27 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood. Levels of 32 nanograms per milliliter are adequate, according to the U.S. Institute of Medicine.

The lowest levels of vitamin D were in non-whites and those with late-stage breast cancer.

The researchers found that weekly supplementation with high doses of vitamin D (50,000 IU or more) boosted the levels of the vitamin among all the women.

The study was to be presented Oct. 8 at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's breast cancer symposium in San Francisco.

Previous studies have shown that nearly half of all women and men have vitamin D levels below 32 nanograms per milliliter. Along with strengthening bones, vitamin D plays an important role in cell growth and keeping the immune system strong. People obtain Vitamin D through exposure to sunlight and from foods such as milk and fortified cereals.

SOURCES: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Oct. 8, 2009