ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Add your Article

Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients

(HealthDay News) -- Many breast cancer patients have low levels of vitamin D, which could lead to weaker bones and increased risk of fractures, say U.S. researchers who recommend high doses of vitamin D for them.

"Vitamin D is essential to maintaining bone health, and women with breast cancer have accelerated bone loss due to the nature of hormone therapy and chemotherapy. It's important for women and their doctors to work together to boost their vitamin D intake," Luke Peppone, a research assistant professor of radiation oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a news release from the medical cwnter.

Peppone and colleagues studied 166 women undergoing treatment for breast cancer and found that nearly 70 percent had low levels of vitamin D in their blood. The average level among the women was 27 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood. Levels of 32 nanograms per milliliter are adequate, according to the U.S. Institute of Medicine.

The lowest levels of vitamin D were in non-whites and those with late-stage breast cancer.

The researchers found that weekly supplementation with high doses of vitamin D (50,000 IU or more) boosted the levels of the vitamin among all the women.

The study was to be presented Oct. 8 at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's breast cancer symposium in San Francisco.

Previous studies have shown that nearly half of all women and men have vitamin D levels below 32 nanograms per milliliter. Along with strengthening bones, vitamin D plays an important role in cell growth and keeping the immune system strong. People obtain Vitamin D through exposure to sunlight and from foods such as milk and fortified cereals.

SOURCES: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Oct. 8, 2009