ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
The Raw Food Diet
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
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Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men

FRIDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin K slows the development of insulin resistance in older men, but not women, a new study found.

Insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes, occurs when the body cannot use insulin properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood. Overweight and obese people are prone to insulin resistance, because excess fat can interfere with insulin function.

The three-year study, by researchers at the Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston, included 355 non-diabetic men and women ages 60 to 80. One group took daily multivitamins containing 500 micrograms of vitamin K (five times the recommended level), along with a calcium and vitamin D supplement. The other (control) group took no vitamin K supplementation but did receive the multivitamin and the calcium and vitamin D supplement. Both groups were told to keep eating their normal diets.

By the end of the study, the men who took vitamin K had improved insulin resistance and lower blood insulin levels than men in the control group. The study was published in the November issue of the journal Diabetes Care.

"Men who received vitamin K supplementation had less progression in their insulin resistance by the end of the clinical trial. Conversely, we saw progression in insulin resistance in women who received vitamin K supplementation, and in the men or women who were not given vitamin K supplements," study senior author Sarah Booth, director of the Vitamin K Laboratory at the research center, said in a Tufts news release.

Weight may explain why vitamin K supplementation didn't appear to improve insulin resistance in older women.

"In our study, there was a higher prevalence of obese or overweight women in the vitamin K supplementation group compared to the male supplementation group," Booth said. "Vitamin K is stored in fat tissue. If there is excess fat, vitamin K may not be readily available to cells that require it to process glucose."

The amount of vitamin K contained in the supplements used in the study is attainable by consuming a healthy diet, the researchers said. Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and dark, leafy greens (such as spinach and collards) are good sources of vitamin K.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about insulin resistance and pre-diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Tufts University, news release, Nov. 26, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 05, 2008

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