ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Add your Article

Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men

FRIDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin K slows the development of insulin resistance in older men, but not women, a new study found.

Insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes, occurs when the body cannot use insulin properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood. Overweight and obese people are prone to insulin resistance, because excess fat can interfere with insulin function.

The three-year study, by researchers at the Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston, included 355 non-diabetic men and women ages 60 to 80. One group took daily multivitamins containing 500 micrograms of vitamin K (five times the recommended level), along with a calcium and vitamin D supplement. The other (control) group took no vitamin K supplementation but did receive the multivitamin and the calcium and vitamin D supplement. Both groups were told to keep eating their normal diets.

By the end of the study, the men who took vitamin K had improved insulin resistance and lower blood insulin levels than men in the control group. The study was published in the November issue of the journal Diabetes Care.

"Men who received vitamin K supplementation had less progression in their insulin resistance by the end of the clinical trial. Conversely, we saw progression in insulin resistance in women who received vitamin K supplementation, and in the men or women who were not given vitamin K supplements," study senior author Sarah Booth, director of the Vitamin K Laboratory at the research center, said in a Tufts news release.

Weight may explain why vitamin K supplementation didn't appear to improve insulin resistance in older women.

"In our study, there was a higher prevalence of obese or overweight women in the vitamin K supplementation group compared to the male supplementation group," Booth said. "Vitamin K is stored in fat tissue. If there is excess fat, vitamin K may not be readily available to cells that require it to process glucose."

The amount of vitamin K contained in the supplements used in the study is attainable by consuming a healthy diet, the researchers said. Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and dark, leafy greens (such as spinach and collards) are good sources of vitamin K.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about insulin resistance and pre-diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Tufts University, news release, Nov. 26, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 05, 2008

Copyright © 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com